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Weird National Briefs (11/11/2020)

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A chicken in every geyser

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) — Cooking chickens in a Yellowstone hot spring landed three people in hot water.

A park ranger heard that a group with cooking pots were hiking toward the park’s Shoshone Geyser Basin. The ranger found two whole chickens in a burlap sack in a hot spring. A cooking pot was nearby, Yellowstone spokeswoman Linda Veress said.

“Make dinner,” said defendant Eric Roberts, of Idaho Falls, Idaho, when asked Thursday what the group was up to in the Yellowstone backcountry.

As for whose idea it was: “It was kind of a joint thing,” Roberts explained.

Roberts and Dallas Roberts, of West Valley City, Utah, were ordered to serve two days in jail and pay $540 in fines and fees for the Aug. 7, incident, according to court documents.

Eric Romriell, of Idaho Falls, paid $1,250 in fines and fees. All three are banned from Yellowstone while serving two years of unsupervised probation.

Dallas Roberts didn’t have a working listed number and Romriell didn’t immediately return a message Thursday at his ophthalmology clinic.

Getting too close to and messing around with Yellowstone’s hot springs are no-nos and can be dangerous but violations aren’t unusual.

A Dutch man was ordered to pay $3,000 for allegedly crashing a drone into the park’s famous Grand Prismatic Spring in 2014.

TME – What a bunch of clucking idiots.

Later, gator!

OKEECHOBEE, Fla. (AP) — A Florida school named after Everglades National Park experienced a taste of what the wetlands has to offer when a small alligator appeared on the school’s playground.

The Okeechobee County Sheriff’s Office said its deputies found the alligator Wednesday at Everglades Elementary School, according to a department Facebook post.

The school’s mascot is an alligator clad in orange, which is a bit different from the 4-foot-6-inch (1.4-meter) alligator the deputies captured.

Deputies later released the gator in the Nubbin Slough River, but not before affectionately naming it “Everglades.”

TME – You don’t even want to know who showed up after a while.

Rough sledding

CLAYTON, Wis. (AP) — The Wisconsin State Patrol had a little advice for a guy who transported a snowmobile by strapping it to the roof of his Toyota Corolla: Bad idea.

A trooper pulled over the driver on Highway 63 in northwestern Wisconsin on Sunday afternoon after seeing the snowmobile perched sideways on top of the sedan.

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation tweeted a photo of the car with the Polaris topper on Monday with a message: “Folks, don’t try this at home.”

The 23-year-old driver was issued a warning about the hauling technique and cited for failing to buckle up, according to DOT spokeswoman Christena O’Brien.

The driver, Matthew Schmit, of Clayton, told the trooper he had just bought the snowmobile and was driving it over to a friend’s house to show him, the Star Tribune reported.

“I know it looks sketchy, but we had it strapped down and shook it,” he said. “Up like in this kind of region, stuff like this gets seen all the time, but more like the back roads.”

Schmit told the trooper his vehicle had Minnesota license plates because he had purchased the car in the Twin Cities last spring and hadn’t gotten around to transferring the title.

TME – Put that car on a flatbed and it’s a Wisconsin nesting doll.

A whale of a tail

SPIJKENISSE, Netherlands (AP) — The front carriage of a Dutch metro train that landed on a sculpture of a whale’s tail after plowing through the end of an elevated section of rails was painstakingly lifted clear of the artwork Tuesday and lowered to the ground.

The train was left precariously balanced on the whale’s tail 10 meters (33 feet) above the ground Monday, after plunging off the end of a metro line in Spijkenisse, a town on the southern edge of Rotterdam.

Two large yellow cranes worked in tandem Tuesday, placing chains around the front and rear of the train’s foremost carriage to support it. In an operation that started at dawn and lasted into the darkness of evening, workers also cut it loose from another carriage and removed its wheels before the train was lowered slowly to the ground.

About 30 people watching the operation cheered as the front carriage finally was separated from the rest of the train amid gathering darkness and cheered again when it was deposited on the ground.

The train was empty at the time it crashed onto the sculpture and the driver escaped unhurt, thanks to the whale tail’s unlikely catch.

The local security authority said the driver was interviewed by police Monday as part of the investigation into the cause of the crash and allowed to go home.

TME – Wasn’t Denzel in this movie?

First daughter

LAKEVIEW, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan couple whose large family attracted attention by growing to include 14 sons has welcomed their first daughter nearly three decades after the birth of their first child.

Kateri Schwandt gave birth Thursday to Maggie Jayne, who weighed in at 7 pounds, 8 ounces (3.4 kilograms) and entered a world filled with 14 older brothers.

Jay Schwandt said he and his wife, both 45, “are overjoyed and beyond excited to add Maggie Jayne to our family.”

“This year has been memorable in so many ways, for so many reasons, but Maggie is the greatest gift we could ever imagine,” he told the Detroit Free Press following his daughter’s birth at Mercy Health Saint Mary’s Hospital in Grand Rapids.

The Schwandts have been featured for years in local and national news as their family has grown. The couple have a livestreaming program called “14 Outdoorsmen” that may now need a name change.

Their oldest child, Tyler Schwandt, 28, said his parents thought they would never have a daughter after 14 sons. He said there’s likely nothing pink in the family’s home in the rural community of Lakeview, about 30 miles (48 kilometers) northeast of Grand Rapids.

“I don’t even know if my mom owns any pink clothing — or anything,” said Tyler, who is engaged to be married and recently bought a home 20 minutes away from his parents’ 200-acre (81-hectare) farm.

The Schwandts started dating as freshmen, attending Gaylord High School and Gaylord St. Mary’s, respectively. They wed in 1993, before they attended Ferris State University, and before they graduated the couple had three sons.

Both earned advanced degrees, even as their family grew. Kateri holds a master’s degree in social work from Grand Valley State University, and Jay, who is a lawyer and owner of a land surveying business, holds a law degree from Western Michigan University’s Thomas M. Cooley Law School.

TME – If at first you don’t succeed, try 14 more times.

Last modified on Tuesday, 10 November 2020 05:06

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