Admin

Posted by

Allen Adams Allen Adams
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

edge staff writer

Share

Weird National Briefs (10/20/2021)

Rate this item
(0 votes)

Circle of life

PINE, Colo. (AP) — Wildlife officials in Colorado say an elusive elk that has been wandering the hills with a car tire around its neck for at least two years has finally been freed of the obstruction.

The 4 1/2-year-old, 600-pound (270-kilogram) bull elk was spotted near Pine Junction, southwest of Denver, on Saturday evening and tranquilized, according to Colorado Parks and Wildlife. Officers with the agency had to cut off the elk’s five-point antlers to remove the encumbrance because they couldn’t slice through the steel in the bead of the tire.

“We would have preferred to cut the tire and leave the antlers for his rutting activity, but the situation was dynamic, and we had to just get the tire off in any way possible,” officer Scott Murdoch said.

Murdoch and fellow officer Dawson Swanson estimated the elk shed about 35 pounds (16 kilograms) with the removal of the tire, the antlers and debris inside the tire.

Wildlife officers first spotted the elk with the tire around its neck in July 2019 while conducting a population survey for Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and mountain goats in the Mount Evans Wilderness.

They say they have seen deer, elk, moose, bears and other wildlife become entangled in a number of items, including swing sets, hammocks, clotheslines, decorative or holiday lighting, furniture, tomato cages, chicken feeders, laundry baskets, soccer goals and volleyball nets.

TME – He looked pretty tired.

Snake, rattle and roll

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Al Wolf is used to clearing one or two snakes from under houses but recently was called by a woman who said she had seen rattlesnakes scurry under her Northern California house and was surprised to find more than 90 rattlesnakes getting ready to hibernate.

Wolf, director of Sonoma County Reptile Rescue, said he crawled under the mountainside home in Santa Rosa and found a rattlesnake right away, then another and another. He got out from under the house, grabbed two buckets, put on long, safety gloves, and went back in. He crawled on his hands, knees and stomach, tipping over more than 200 small rocks.

“I kept finding snakes for the next almost four hours,” Wolf said Friday. “I thought ‘oh, good, it was a worthwhile call’ but I was happy to get out because it’s not nice, you run into spider webs and dirt and it smells crappy and it’s musty and you’re on your belly and you’re dirty. I mean it was work.”

But the work paid off. He used a 24-inch (60-centimeter) snake pole to remove 22 adult rattlesnakes and 59 babies when he first visited the home in the Mayacamas Mountains on Oct. 2. He returned another two times since and collected 11 more snakes. He also found a dead cat and dead possum.

All the snakes were Northern Pacific rattlesnakes, the only venomous snake found in Northern California, he said.

Wolf, who has been rescuing snakes for 32 years and has been bitten 13 times, said he responds to calls about snakes under homes in 17 counties and has seen dozens of them in one place in the wild but never under a home.

He said he releases the rattlesnakes in the wild away from people and sometimes in private land when ranchers request them for pest control.

Wolf said there are plans to return to the house again before the end of the month to see if any more snakes arrived.

“We know it’s a den site already because of the babies, and the amount of females I found,” he said.

TME – Move. Now.

Two heads are better than one

BARNSTABLE, Mass. (AP) — A rare two-headed diamondback terrapin turtle is alive and kicking — with all six of its legs — at the Birdsey Cape Wildlife Center in Massachusetts after hatching two weeks ago.

A threatened species in the state, this turtle is feeding well on blood worms and food pellets, staff at the center say. The two heads operate independently, coming up for air at different times, and inside its shell are two gastrointestinal systems to feed both sides of its body.

The turtle originally came from a nest in West Barnstable that researchers determined was in a hazardous location and needed to be moved. After hatching, turtles in these so-called “head start” nests are sent to different care centers to be monitored before their release in the spring, The Cape Cod Times reported.

Center veterinarian Pria Patel and other staff members will continue to monitor the turtle, which they nicknamed Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen after the twin child stars. The staff is hoping to perform a CT scan to learn more about its circulatory system.

TME – That’s one shell of a tale.

You’ll never walk alone

ROYAL OAK, Mich. (AP) — A large cat native to Africa that escaped from its suburban Detroit home was captured after spending several hours on the lam, according to an animal recovery group.

News of the capture of the caracal came at about 11 p.m. Wednesday when the South Lyon Murphy Lost Animal Recovery posted a video online of the animal, The Detroit News reported.

“He was located in a partially fenced back yard where we were able to drop the trap,” the post said.

The animal’s escape was first reported to police at 6:30 a.m. Wednesday by a Royal Oak resident who said she discovered that two of her four caracals had walked through an open gate.

One of the caracals was spotted a short time later, caught and returned to its owner, officials said.

Caracals are classified in a category of animal that isn’t regulated by the state. They prey on rodents, other small mammals and birds. They also are native to the Middle East, Central Asia, and India.

TME – That cat was bustin’ out all over.

Rescue dog

KERHONKSON, N.Y. (AP) — A dog trapped for five days deep inside a narrow, rocky crevice at a state park north of New York City was rescued unharmed — though it was hungry and thirsty, parks officials said Wednesday.

While the 12-year-old dog, Liza, went days without food or water at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve, it was observed licking the damp walls of the crevice before a rescuer was finally able to shimmy in Tuesday, the state parks agency said in a news release.

A local woman was hiking with the dog Thursday when it fell out of sight into crevice. Park staffers were unable to get into the crevice to help the barking dog.

Two members of the New Jersey Initial Response Team, a volunteer group specializing in cave rescue, were able to descend into the crevice enough on Tuesday to get a specialized plumbing camera close enough to observe Liza.

Rescuer Jessica Van Ord shimmied through the passage and used a hot dog hanging from the end of a modified catch pole to attract the dog into putting its head into a loop. That allowed another rescuer nearby to close the loop.

“This was a tight vertical fissure leading to an even tighter horizontal crack. Only Jessica Van Ord, our smallest team member, was able to squeeze and contort herself more than 40 feet from the surface to reach the dog,” Mark Dickey, chief of the response team, said in the news release.

TME – Maybe Liza is an indoor pup from now on.

Last modified on Wednesday, 20 October 2021 07:16

Advertisements

The Maine Edge. All rights reserved. Privacy policy. Terms & Conditions.

Website CMS and Development by Links Online Marketing, LLC, Bangor Maine