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Some things are better left alone.

Now, I’m not one to wring my hands and clutch my pearls over Hollywood’s current IP-driven phase. I don’t hate the franchises and sequels and reboots and remakes; certainly not to the same degree as some of my critical peers. It’s not often great cinema, but people (and I include myself there) like what they like.

But sometimes, we get an idea that really seems like a mistake.

“The Many Saints of Newark” – currently in theaters and streaming on HBO Max – is an attempt at crafting a prequel to “The Sopranos,” the seminal HBO drama that in many ways redefined what the television medium could do over the course of its six seasons. That series – still considered to be one of the greatest TV shows ever – followed the mobster Tony Soprano through the violence and vulnerability of his complicated life. It remains insightful and enthralling and utterly brilliant, even now.

So did we REALLY need a prequel?

Look, a lot of the behind-the-scenes people involved with “The Sopranos” are here; series creator David Chase wrote the script along with Lawrence Konner and the film’s director Alan Taylor spent serious time behind the camera on the show. There are some wildly talented performers in the cast as well. But there seems to be an absence of focus, a desire to try and tell too many different stories all at once. You probably think this film is a Tony Soprano origin story – I certainly did – but while that’s part of the picture, it is just that – a part. And perhaps not even the main part at that.

Published in Movies

When a film trots out the phrase “based on a true story,” that can mean a lot of things, from a meticulous recreation of well-documented events (albeit with some dramatic license) to a largely constructed fiction that borrows a couple of ostensibly true elements from a preexisting story. But if the “true story” in question already has a complicated relationship with veracity?

Well … then you get “The Conjuring” films.

The latest installment in the increasingly sprawling horror franchise is “The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It.” It’s the third “Conjuring” film proper, though there have been a number of spin-off/tangentially connected movies as well. Directed by Michael Chaves from a screenplay by David Leslie Johnson-McGoldrick, it’s a continuation of the supernatural adventures of paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren.

As with any franchise, the law of diminishing returns is in play; this one is no exception. While it does feature some solid performances and a couple of decent jump scares, the truth is that this new offering doesn’t reach the level of the previous two films in the series.

Published in Movies

There’s something joyful about giant monster movies. They inspire a kind of glee, a sense of childlike wonder in the viewer. Sometimes, it can be nice to go to the movies and get swept away by sheer, unwavering bigness. Even when it is dorky and/or shoddy and/or low-rent, the sense of scale is always there.

Godzilla movies and their ilk have been the foundation of that particular niche. And in this current climate of cinematic universes, it’s no surprise that Hollywood has decided to shoehorn everyone’s favorite gigantic radioactive lizard into a franchise of his own.

“Godzilla: King of the Monsters” is a follow-up to 2014’s “Godzilla.” Those movies – along with 2017’s “Kong: Skull Island” – are the beginnings of what I’m going to go ahead and call the BAMCU (Big-Ass Monster Cinematic Universe). This latest installment is the one where the multi-film world-building begins in earnest, the one that strives to develop the connective tissue necessary to tie these blockbusters together.

But while “Godzilla: King of the Monsters” offers up a fair amount of monster-on-monster action and updated versions of some classic Toho creatures, it can’t quite deliver on the connectivity side of things. Balancing the stakes – skyscraper-sized reptiles shooting lasers at each other versus human beings trying to save both their families and the world – was always going to be a tricky task … and it’s a task that director Michael Dougherty and his team never quite manage.

Published in Movies
Wednesday, 24 July 2013 16:22

The Conjuring' offers old-school frights

Horror film filled with terror and tension

Hearing the words 'Based on a true story' connected to a film is always a mixed bag at best. You're always curious as to just how much is true and how much is trumped up to make for a better movie. It's probably worst with horror films not only did we have classics such the original 'Amityville Horror' and 'Texas Chainsaw Massacre' with their supposed toeholds in reality, but you've got stuff like 'The Blair Witch Project' that goes out of its way in an attempt to convince us of the truth inherent to its (very) fictional premise.

Published in Movies

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