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I’ll be honest with you – I’ve never really been much of a music guy. I simply don’t feel the same connection to music that so many people do. It’s not that I don’t like music, mind you. I just don’t need it in the way that true musicophiles do.

That said, I definitely dig a good music documentary. Even without that visceral, cellular-level type connection to the music, the stories behind the music – the people and places and influences that brought that music to life – remain fascinating to me.

As you might imagine, the new Todd Haynes documentary “The Velvet Underground” – currently streaming on Apple TV+ - fits the bill perfectly. To have someone like Haynes, a filmmaker with an idiosyncratic eye and an obvious adoration of music that permeates his filmography, take on one of the most influential rock bands of all time? What kind of wonderful result could we expect?

An apt one, as it turns out, a perfect marriage of documentarian and subject. Haynes proves to be just the right person to capture the frenetic bohemian energy of not just The Velvet Underground, but of their surroundings. The pieces will be familiar, but the whole into which they have been assembled is unlike any music documentary you’ve seen before. In many ways, this film is an experience – an evocative reflection of the band’s place in the cultural zeitgeist.

Published in Movies
Tuesday, 10 December 2019 12:01

‘Dark Waters’ a low-key legal drama

People often call films “difficult to watch,” but that term can mean different things to different people. Usually, it’s applied to movies that too graphic, whether it be in terms of violence or language or what have you, but sometimes, you get a movie that is difficult to watch because it forces you to learn or remember an unpleasant truth.

That’s the case with “Dark Waters,” the latest film from director Todd Haynes. It’s adapted from a 2016 magazine article by Nathanial Rich titled “The Lawyer Who Became DuPont’s Worst Nightmare,” the story of one man’s tireless crusade to hold industry accountable when its actions are harmful to the public at large.

The story being told is one of malfeasance writ large and the years-long effort to right the wrongs that have been done. It’s also about the harm that obsession – no matter how righteous or just – can have on someone and the people around them. It is about corporate willingness to fight tooth and nail against anything that may stand in the way of almighty profit … and just how much it takes to stand strong in the face of “progress.”

Published in Movies

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