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BANGOR – Who was the boy who never grew up before he never grew up?

That’s the question asked and answered by “Peter and the Starcatcher,” the latest production from Penobscot Theatre Company. The play – adapted by Rick Elice from the 2004 novel “Peter and the Starcatchers” by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson – serves as a prequel of sorts to the classic J.M. Barrie tales of the one, the only Peter Pan.

The Bangor Opera House springs to raucous, rowdy life with this piece. Directed by Matt Hawkins, it’s a chance for audiences to learn the origin of the original Lost Boy, as well as meet the girl who helped set him on the path he would eventually follow. Laughter and thrills abound as this rollicking adventure plays out on the high seas and beyond.

Packed with pirates and pratfalls and plenty of music – directed by Kevin O’Donnell – and magic, featuring some stellar performances and phenomenal production values, “Peter and the Starcatcher” promises loads of holiday fun for the whole family. The show runs through December 29.

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BANGOR – One of Hollywood’s favorite friendships is currently being brought to life at the Bangor Opera House.

“Matt & Ben” is the latest production from Penobscot Theatre Company. The show – an examination of the friendship between Matt Damon and Ben Affleck penned by Mindy Kaling and Brenda Withers – is directed by Lavina Jadhwani and stars Jen Shepard and Tina Muñoz Pandya as the titular pair. That’s right – these two dudes are being played by women. The show runs through November 6.

The play is an exploration of an early time in the lifelong friendship of these two men, a time before they were magazine cover-gracing Oscar-winning movie stars. A time when they were just a couple of guys starting out on a journey toward what they hoped would be fame. A time when the future was both frighteningly unclear and seemingly limitless.

All of it refracted through a satiric lens of feminine energy, magical realism and underlying absurdity, courtesy of the talented twosome in the lead. It is frantic and funny and utterly bizarre, a strange pop cultural amalgam that celebrates and skewers these men both in terms of who they are in that moment and who they might eventually become.

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ORONO – You don’t have to be nuts to enjoy the latest theatrical offering from the University of Maine’s School of Performing Arts – but it helps. And if you are, you’ll have some company.

UMaine’s theatre department opens its season with a production of “Melancholy Play” by Sarah Ruhl. Directed by Rosalie Purvis, this gleefully strange farce runs through October 22 at Hauck Auditorium on the University of Maine campus in Orono. For more information, you can visit the SPA website here.

The play is an exploration of the complexities of emotion, of how the way we feel can impact not just ourselves, but the people around us. It’s a look at the delicacy of interpersonal dynamics and the manner in which those dynamics can shift and evolve as the ties that bind us grow tighter or looser … or just plain weirder.

It is also wildly funny, packed with absurdities that only accentuate the paean to emotionality that rests at its core. All of this brought to vivid, surreal life by a passionate young cast whose talent is second only to their fearlessness.

Published in Style
Wednesday, 21 September 2022 12:31

The complexity of connection – ‘Clarkston’

BANGOR – The power of connection – for good and for ill – is taking center stage at the Bangor Opera House.

“Clarkston,” by Samuel Hunter, opens the 49th season for Penobscot Theatre and runs through October 2. It also marks new artistic director Jonathan Berry’s directorial debut with the company. It’s a bold beginning, one that seems to speak directly to Berry’s tastes and passions as a theatre artist.

It’s an intimate piece, packed with emotional impact and driven by the relationships formed by family or fate and how our humanity is shaped by those relationships. It is a thoughtful, provocative and surprisingly funny play, with myriad juxtapositions and seeming contradictions brought forward by the complicated dynamic between the two young men at its heart.

Finding something meaningful and real between people is rare, a truth illustrated with heart, humor and hubris by the beautiful and challenging play currently gracing the Opera House boards.

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BREWER – One of the region’s most beloved summer theatre traditions is once again gracing the great outdoors.

Ten Bucks Theatre is offering up their annual outdoor Shakespeare adventure. This year’s production is “Romeo and Juliet,” running through July 31 at Brewer’s Indian Trail Park before moving to Fort Knox in Prospect for performances Aug. 4-7. All shows start at 6 p.m. You can find out more at www.tenbuckstheatre.org or by checking them out on Facebook.

There’s nothing quite like sitting outside and letting the brilliance of the Bard wash over you. Ten Bucks Theatre has been giving area audiences that opportunity for years; why not take advantage of the opportunity to see one of his greatest works play out in the bright sunshine?

Now, you probably don’t need me to explain the plot of “Romeo and Juliet” to you – it’s one of the most well-known stories in the entire Western canon. In fact, why don’t I let Prince Escalus give you the heads up? He spells it all out in the Prologue, after all.

Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
And the continuance of their parents' rage,
Which, but their children's end, nought could remove,
Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
The which if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.

I mean, that’s pretty great, right? And it’s even better when you hear Ben Layman deliver it.

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BANGOR – Sex sells. Even when the person discussing it might not be who you’d expect.

Penobscot Theatre Company’s latest production is “Becoming Dr. Ruth,” a one-person show celebrating the life and times of renowned sex therapist and pop cultural icon Dr. Ruth Westheimer. Starring Jen Shepard and directed by Julie Lisnet, the piece – written by Mark St. Germain – is running at the Bangor Opera House through May 22. For tickets or more information, visit the PTC website at www.penobscottheatre.org or call the box office at 942-3333.

The piece – which is set entirely within Dr. Ruth’s New York City apartment – takes place on a June day in 1997. It is a freewheeling tale of one woman’s incredible journey, one that took her all over the world and influenced her in ways large and small – all related to us by the woman herself. The vast majority of us think we know Dr. Ruth – the tiny smiling woman offering sex advice via radio and television – but that aspect of her life, while important, is just one part of her incredible story.

Published in Style
Wednesday, 30 March 2022 12:04

PTC hits the ice with ‘Hockey Mom’

BANGOR – Penobscot Theatre Company is taking to the ice with their latest production.

The fictional town of Clara, Maine, has been Travis G. Baker’s wellspring for three plays with world premieres at Penobscot Theatre Company. The latest, “Hockey Mom,” may well be the best; this new show runs through April 16 at the Bangor Opera House.

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ORONO – Our history books are filled with the names of those who were first, the intrepid figures who undertook the seemingly impossible in the name of exploration and discovery. But what about the names of those lost along the way?

That’s the underlying question of “Terra Nova,” the current show from the University of Maine’s School of Performing Arts. Written by Ted Tally and directed by Julie Arnold Lisnet and running through Feb. 20, it’s the story of the ill-fated British expedition to the South Pole. The race to be first was ultimately won by the Norwegians, but what these five brave men lost was not just the race to glory, but their very lives.

Adapted from the journals of Robert Scott, the leader of the British expedition, this is a story of what it means to sacrifice everything in the name of knowing the unknown. As these men struggle across a seemingly unending sheet of ice, we’re left to watch as their time slowly, inexorably ticks away. But even as all seemed lost, the one thing that these men never lost … was their courage.

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BANGOR – An unconventional love story is playing out on the stage of the Bangor Opera House.

“Maytag Virgin,” written by Audrey Cefaly and directed by Tricia A. Hobbs, is the latest entry in Penobscot Theatre Company’s 48th season. A sweet and charming two-hander, it’s a story about what it means to be in love and the many different paths that can lead us to finding that love we seek. The show runs through Feb. 27.

Playing out over the course of a year, it’s a look at the evolving relationship between two people whose connection begins in the simplest of ways – proximity. They’re new neighbors whose backyards are adjacent, meaning that they are thrust into one another’s orbits. What they do once that shared orbit is entered, however … well, love, like life, is as much about the journey as it is the destination.

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BANGOR – Two local theatre companies have collaborated on a holiday production unlike any you’ve seen before.

Ten Bucks Theatre Company and True North Theatre Company have joined forces this holiday season to offer up their production of “Greetings!” The play – written by Tom Dudzik and directed by Tellis K. Coolong – is running through Dec. 19 at the Ten Bucks Theatre space in the Bangor Mall.

The show is a … let’s call it unconventional take on the usual holiday fare, one that utilizes some familiar tropes of the genre only to subvert them in service of a tale that is far weirder than what you usually see this time of year. Weirder, but no less heartfelt because of that. It’s a story of families and the difficulties that they can have, the pitfalls of communication (and lack thereof) and what it means to believe.

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