Admin

There are plenty of books out there that aim to tell you how to do something. Whether its DIY home repair or computer programming or self-help or what have you, there’s probably a book that purports to tell you how to do it. These books bill themselves as offering straightforward instructions on doing whatever it is you seek to do.

But maybe you’re not looking for straightforward. Maybe the how-tos (hows-to?) you’re looking for are needlessly complicated, convoluted and/or flat-out absurd. And if they’re illustrated with goofy graphs and jokey stick-figure comic strips, so much the better.

If you fall into the latter category, then Randall Munroe’s “How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Real-World Problems” (Riverhead, $28) is the book you’ve been waiting for. The NASA-roboticist-turned-beloved-webcomic-artist aims his unique perspective and skill set at coming up with ridiculous and technically correct (the best kind of correct) advice for dealing with an assortment of everyday – and occasionally not-so-everyday – issues.

The blend of smart and simple that has marked Munroe’s work since the earliest days of online comic sensation xkcd is in full effect in this new book; he takes real joy in finding that weird intersection of scientific thought and anarchic absurdity … and that joy is evident on every page of this book. He wants you to laugh and to learn as you look at the workings of the world through his own peculiarly and particularly cracked lens.

Published in Tekk

Book explores the tech subculture waging war on death

Published in Tekk

Twenty-nine-year old entrepreneur Brendan Alper spent five years working at global investment banking firm Goldman Sachs - and hated it. It was only after quitting the finance trade to become a comedy writer that he says he stumbled upon an idea that has changed his life and, he hopes, the lives of countless others. Hater- Alper’s new dating app, launched on Feb. 8.

Published in Tekk
Wednesday, 28 September 2016 11:32

MIT's flea market specializes in rare electronics

CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts Once a month in the summer, a small parking lot on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's campus transforms into a high-tech flea market known for its outlandish offerings. Tables overflow with antique radio equipment, some of it a century old. Visitors can buy a telescope that's the size of a cannon. One man has hauled in a NASA space capsule he owns.

Published in Tekk
Wednesday, 07 September 2016 08:19

Tech may help older drivers travel a safer road

SAN FRANCISCO Older drivers may soon be traveling a safer road thanks to smarter cars that can detect oncoming traffic, steer clear of trouble and even hit the brakes when a collision appears imminent.

Published in Tekk
Wednesday, 27 July 2016 10:44

Verizon buys Yahoo for $4.8 billion

SAN FRANCISCO Seeking a wider digital audience, Verizon is buying Yahoo for $4.83 billion in a deal that marks the end of an era for a company that defined much of the early internet but struggled to stay relevant in an online world dominated by Google and Facebook.

Published in Biz
Wednesday, 27 July 2016 10:40

Last VCR maker ending production

TOKYO Japanese electronics maker Funai Electric Co. says it's yanking the plug on the world's last video cassette recorder.

Published in Biz

SPRINGFIELD, N.H. Jessie Levine smiles and shakes her head when she hears the outgoing voicemail message on her iPhone.

Published in Tekk
Wednesday, 13 July 2016 11:52

Cellphone etiquette never goes out of style

With wireless devices more prevalent than ever, National Cellphone Courtesy Month provides an opportunity for smartphone users to reevaluate their 'mobile manners' and ensure they're aware of common etiquette tips. A recent U.S. Cellular survey reveals the very people who get upset with others' cellphone etiquette breaches may be just as guilty of the same offenses they are most annoyed by. These findings serve as a reminder to all users to be mindful of their own cellphone etiquette.

Published in Tekk

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Remember the Jetsons' robot maid, Rosie? Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers think her future real-life incarnations can learn a thing or two from Steve Carell and other sitcom stars.

Published in Tekk
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 Next > End >>
Page 1 of 4

Advertisements

Website CMS and Development by Links Online Marketing, LLC, Bangor Maine