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BANGOR/ATLANTA – A lovely tale of one woman’s life as reflected through a poetic namesake is currently available from Penobscot Theatre Company.

“Je Ne Suis Pas Evangeline” (or, “I Am Not Evangeline”) is the latest and last installment in PTC’s ongoing Digitus Theatrum season. It’s a collaborative effort with the Atlanta-based Théâtre du Rêve, a company devoted to bringing the French language and Francophone culture to the American stage. Single household streaming tickets are available at the PTC website at www.penobscottheatre.org; the show runs through May 9.

Inspired by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s 1847 poem “Evangeline, a Tale of Acadie,” which tells the tale of a young Acadian woman who dedicates her life to tracking down her lost love following the tragic displacement of the Acadian people at the hands of the British in the mid-18th century, “Je Ne Suis Pas Evangeline” is an exploration of the nature of identity, both in terms of our perception of ourselves and the perception the world has of us.

Performed in both English and French, it’s driven by a tour de force performance courtesy of Carolyn Cook, the founder and artistic director of Théâtre du Rêve, along with a handful of quietly compelling reenactments.

Published in Style

BANGOR – Penobscot Theatre Company is going to the dogs.

As part of the theatre’s ongoing Digitus Theatrum season, PTC is presenting “The Dog Operas,” a series of three streaming performances set to roll out over the coming weeks. These pieces are the result of a lengthy canine/human collaboration, a multi-species team-up the likes of which the theatre world has never seen.

The first dog opera – “The Barker of Seville” – premiered on March 2. Subsequent operas – “Tosca the Ball” and “Dog Giovanni” – will become available on April 6 and May 4, respectively. Household tickets for all three “pupperas” are $40; the rate for PTC subscribers is $35. These tickets can be purchased through the PTC website at www.penobscottheatre.org or by calling the box office at 942-3333.

I should probably introduce myself. My name is Stella. I’m a Carolina dog whose age is none of your beeswax. My dad Allen is the editor of The Maine Edge. He knew that he wanted something special for this story, but he wasn’t sure what to do. Typical human, right? I let him try to work it out for himself for a while, but when it became clear how clueless he was, I finally gave him a nudge.

Now, this isn’t my usual beat. My primary gig has been working with my dad on the ongoing football picks feature “Kibbles & Picks” – I haven’t really done much in the way of arts coverage, but I figured if my dad can manage it, how hard can it be?

Of course, dog reporting is considerably different than human reporting. Humans need to have all these face-to-face conversations and spend all kinds of time staring at glowing rectangles. Not us canines – I just went for a walk and sent a couple of pee-mails. Word spreads pretty quickly in the doggie community, so it was just a matter of hours before I got some responses – some via howl, others simply through pee-mail responses (although someone – I’m not going to say who – did a pee-ply all that was just a nightmare to sift through).

Published in Buzz

Everyone has their particular tastes when it comes to movies. Even those of us whose job it is to offer up opinions regarding films have our personal preferences. And while we strive for objectivity, we also recognize that when it comes down to it, we like what we like. Taste matters.

Take action movies, for instance. There are those out there who find action movies to be generally lacking in appeal, who think that watching bullets and/or fists flying simply doesn’t make for good cinema. They are entitled to their opinion.

Their wrong, wrong, wrong opinion.

“Extraction,” the latest Netflix original offering to hit the streaming service, isn’t the greatest or most original action movie you’ll see … and that’s OK. See, it’s driven by some excellent set pieces and a strong lead performance from Chris Hemsworth, which means that it’s plenty good enough. It isn’t necessary to innovate when you’re willing to embrace the essence of what has always worked.

Adapted by Joe Russo from his own graphic novel “Ciudad” and directed by longtime stunt coordinator and first-time feature director Sam Hargrave, “Extraction” adheres pretty closely to standard action tropes. However, by executing at a high level, the film manages to largely transcend formula, offering viewers a thrilling and exciting two hours of escapist action.

Published in Movies
Wednesday, 20 December 2017 14:14

Amazon’s latest a Van Damme good one

“Jean-Claude Van Johnson” an absurd action parody

Published in Buzz

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