Admin

The American immigrant experience has been a subject of some truly great art over the years. Incredible books and films have spring from the exploration of what it means for people to come to this country in pursuit of a better life, as well as what happens in the course of that pursuit.

But to my knowledge, none have ever told that story through the lens of accidental pickle preservation. Until now.

“An American Pickle,” currently streaming on HBO Max, is a comedy that brings the early 20th century immigrant experience into the present day … by dropping someone into a pickle barrel for a hundred years. Yes, it’s as absurd as it sounds, broad and weird and a lot of fun.

Starring Seth Rogen as both a turn-of-the-century immigrant and a modern-day Brooklyn app developer, the film mines big laughs out of its bizarre premise (though it perhaps doesn’t dig as it deep as it could). It’s a twist on the classic fish out of water trope, giving us a look at our current world through the eyes of the past.

Published in Movies
Wednesday, 21 August 2019 09:56

The kids are all right - ‘Good Boys’

I was always going to like “Good Boys.”

Few comedic conventions sit as squarely in my wheelhouse as children cursing. What can I say? There will always be a part of me that remains eternally 13, just as there will always be movies that speak to that part of me. Much of the appeal is the juxtaposition against the relative innocence of childhood, of course, but I wasn’t prepared for how genuinely that innocence was going to be treated.

That sense of genuineness is what allows “Good Boys” to be something more than simply crass. There’s an underlying sweetness to it, one that focuses on the reality that no matter how much the world around them may change, there will always be certain things about being 12 years old that never will.

Published in Movies
Friday, 03 May 2019 11:58

‘Long Shot’ pays off big

Lately, it might seem as though every single studio movie is either a nine-figure-budgeted franchise blockbuster or a low-overhead genre movie. And yes, there’s a lot of that kind of stuff out there. But those who have bemoaned the loss of the mid-budget studio film should take solace, for the reports of its death have been greatly exaggerated. Sure, we see FEWER of those movies, but they’re far from over.

“Long Shot” is a perfect example of just that kind of film. A high-concept hybrid of political comedy and juvenilia, it’s a rom-com that tries to be a lot of different things and is largely successful. It’s an unconventional execution of a movie-conventional pairing between Seth Rogen and Charlize Theron, lending a surprising degree of nuance to the standard mixed-attractiveness comic screen pairing.

It’s also an attempt at political satire, an effort to poke fun at the current climate. Government operations and the media both take their share of hits, and while the effort doesn’t land as well as the relationship stuff, it still manages its share of laughs. It’s a movie that is smart and profane, putting forth cleverness and crassness in equal (and often hilarious) measure.

Published in Movies
Friday, 12 August 2016 10:24

Wieners gone wild - 'Sausage Party'

R-rated animated comedy effectively offensive

I have no idea how 'Sausage Party' came to be released.

Published in Movies

'Sorority Rising' a rehash, but not without its own crass charms

Here in the summer season, we talk a lot about the relative necessity of sequels; we see plenty of them during this segment of the cinematic calendar, after all. To be clear, this isn't about franchise-building. This is about sequels to films that, while successful to some degree, don't appear to really invite revisiting.

Published in Movies
Wednesday, 19 June 2013 13:43

Judgment Day jollity This Is the End'

Apocalyptic ensemble comedy proves surprisingly entertaining

I'm a firm believer in the humor potential inherent to actors playing themselves. There's something wonderfully anarchic about performers playing hyperstylized versions of themselves; it can really make for a phenomenal guest-starring turn.

But the idea of making an entire movie that way? Where every one of the main players is playing him or herself or at least, a version thereof? Could you really build a quality film on that sort of foundation? It seems unlikely, no?

Published in Movies
Friday, 07 October 2011 14:32

The lighter side of cancer

50/50' offers humor, heartbreak and humanity

Sometimes, the best, healthiest way to deal with tragedy or trauma is to laugh. Sure, it sounds counterintuitive at best, morbid at worst, but the simple truth is that there are times in our lives when you have to laugh or else you'll cry.

Discovering the humor in an inherently sad situation can be tough, especially in a film, when the slightest misstep can turn the audience against your characters in a heartbeat. Tiptoeing through the minefield of love, loss, sadness and pathos is a dangerous game, a game that can blow up in your face at any time.

But when that balance is achieved, when you can walk that narrow path through the minefield and come out on the other side, you've got something special.

Published in Movies

Advertisements

The Maine Edge. All rights reserved. Privacy policy. Terms & Conditions.

Website CMS and Development by Links Online Marketing, LLC, Bangor Maine