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Bring on the no-hitters! Keep ‘em coming!

As crazy as it seems, I am once again writing about MLB’s promulgation of no-hit games. While I’ve alluded to the possibility of a record-breaking number of no-nos in 2021, I had no idea that said record might fall by the All-Star break.

And yet here we are, with two more no-hitters spun by big league pitchers last week – Spencer Turnbull of the Detroit Tigers shut down the Seattle Mariners on May 18, while New York Yankee Corey Kluber blew away the Texas Rangers the VERY NEXT DAY.

Depending on who you ask, this puts us at either six or seven no-hitters in just the first two months of the season.

(Officially, the number is six. Unofficially – and in my own humble opinion – it’s seven, because I am firmly in the “Madison Bumgarner’s seven-inning complete game no-hitter is a no-hitter” camp. I’m not going to relitigate that argument again here – just check out either of my previous no-hitter piece from late April to get the entirety of my feelings on the matter.)

So will we see that magic number fall this season? Is 2021 the year we finally cross into the realm of eight no-hitters and beyond? It certainly seems within the realm of possibility, though there are certainly factors working against it as well.

Published in Sports

Every couple of years, I find myself writing a variation of the same story. There will be a cluster of no-hit games pitched in the majors and I, as a fascinated student of baseball history, will wonder if we are about to see a season in which we get more than the record seven no-hitters we saw in 1990, 1991 and 2012 (I got to write about that last one).

But after the past week saw not one, but two no-hitters added to the total of the still-nascent 2021 MLB season, the question must be asked again: Is THIS the year of the no-hitter?

With no-nos thrown by John Means of the Baltimore Orioles and Wade Miley of the Cincinnati Reds within days of each other, the season’s total for no-hit games already stands at four – more than halfway there.

(Well, officially four anyway. Unofficially, it’s five, because I am firmly in the “Madison Bumgarner’s seven-inning complete game no-hitter is a no-hitter” camp. I’m not going to relitigate that argument again here – just head to the website and check out my piece from a couple of weeks ago to get the entirety of my feelings on the matter.)

So will we see that magic number of seven fall this season? It certainly seems within the realm of possibility, though there are factors working against it as well.

Published in Sports
Tuesday, 27 April 2021 10:58

New rules lead to no-hitter nonsense

When is a no-hitter not a no-hitter?

That’s the existential question raised by Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Madison Bumgarner’s performance on April 25. In the second half of a scheduled doubleheader against Atlanta, Bumgarner pitched a complete game shutout and didn’t allow a single hit to a Braves batter.

Exciting, right? Bumgarner joins Joe Musgrove of the San Diego Padres and Carlos Rodon of the Chicago White Sox this season in pitching a complete game and shutting down the opposition without allowing a single hit.

But in the eyes of Major League Baseball, it’s not a no-hitter. Not officially.

See, MLB has had a rule in place since 1991 that states that for a no-hitter to be officially recognized, the pitcher must complete at least nine innings. Games in which the pitcher does not reach that benchmark are not counted as no-hitters in the eyes of the league. MLB’s current rules, in effect since last season, state that doubleheader games are now scheduled for seven innings. This means that Bumgarner’s gem, while a complete game, doesn’t count as an official no-hitter.

But should it?

Published in Sports

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