Admin

The great internet arbiter Judge John Hodgman has a saying: “Nostalgia is a toxic impulse.” While I don’t necessarily fully agree with that sentiment – I think there can be real value in reengaging with aspects of our past that we remember fondly – I also acknowledge that the tendency to get lost in our own personal pop culture ephemera-strewn memory palaces can result in some dark turns.

All this is to say that while I understand why “Space Jam: A New Legacy” was made and the thoughts and desires that led to that outcome, enabling the nostalgic impulse without any critical regard to the reasons behind the memory can result in something hollow and ultimately unsatisfactory.

As a late Gen-Xer, I’m a hair too old to have the same fondness for 1996’s “Space Jam” that many millennials carry. However, I do still carry a soft spot for the film – I mean, Michael Jordan, the Looney Tunes and a pre-folk hero Bill Murray? What’s not to like?

That said, the sequel – this one starring LeBron James – fails to achieve even the modicum of loose charm that surrounded the original, exchanging the winking self-awareness and quirkiness of the original for a seemingly unending cavalcade of product placement and self-celebratory IP exploitation.

Directed by Malcolm D. Lee (who replaced original director Terrence Nance a few weeks into filming) from a screenplay with no less than six credited writers, “Space Jam: A New Legacy” is the unfortunate result when you attempt to recreate something whose appeal you don’t fully understand; there’s a goofball kitschiness to the original film that is lost here, the lunacy (sorry – “Loon-acy”) replaced by an overstuffed commitment to the idea that instead of using references to make jokes, the jokes ARE the references.

Published in Sports

The NBA has reached the playoffs, so the regular season is already in the rearview mirror. Teams are thinking of nothing more than making the Finals and winning a championship.

But while the regular season awards won’t be announced for weeks, the voting is still fresh. And while predicting the winners of these awards is largely a fool’s errand, well … everybody plays the fool.

Here are some thoughts on who might be hoisting the hardware:

Published in Sports
Tuesday, 23 January 2018 23:24

LeBron crosses 30K point threshold

LeBron has passed yet another marker on his journey toward basketball immortality.

With a basket at the end of the first quarter in a game against the San Antonio Spurs on Jan. 24, the Cleveland Cavaliers small forward became the seventh NBA player to score at least 30,000 career points. It’s rarified air – the names above him read like a who’s who of the game’s greats. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Karl Malone, Kobe Bryant, Michael Jordan, Wilt Chamberlain and Dirk Nowitzki (the only other active player to have crossed that threshold).

He is also the youngest to do so by more than a year, reaching the mark at 33 years, 24 days; the previous fastest to 30K was Bryant at 34 years, 104 days. His relative youth – as well as the fact that he continues to perform at the highest level – means that he has a real shot at continuing to climb the list.

Maybe even all the way to the top.

Published in Sports
Wednesday, 08 June 2016 11:01

Curry won't play for U.S. Olympic team

Stephen Curry has withdrawn from consideration from the Olympics, leaving the U.S. basketball team without the NBA's MVP.

Published in Sports
Tuesday, 31 December 2013 00:40

LeBron James named AP Male Athlete of the Year

MIAMI The only thing that keeps LeBron James up worrying at night is basketball, which simultaneously makes perfect sense and no sense.

On one hand, he's the game's best player.

Published in Sports

Advertisements

The Maine Edge. All rights reserved. Privacy policy. Terms & Conditions.

Website CMS and Development by Links Online Marketing, LLC, Bangor Maine