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Journey keyboardist and songwriter Jonathan Cain says the perfect opening for his long-awaited memoir, “Don’t Stop Believin’: The Man, the Band, and the Song that Inspired Generations” (Zondervan/Harper Collins), arrived when his band received a richly deserved, long overdue accolade in April 2017.

“The opening is the most important part of a memoir,” Cain told me during an interview for BIG 104 FM and The Maine Edge. “Those first three chapters are so important for setting the stage. Once Journey was finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, I had my opening. I’m glad that I had that experience because I don’t think it would have been the same book without it.”

A band that had achieved mega-success more than a quarter-century before the Rock Hall induction, Journey had been continually snubbed by the nominating committee – that is until they appeared on an online fan vote ballot. Journey’s loyal and passionate audience – the same one responsible for the sale of nearly 50 million of the band’s albums in the U.S. - responded overwhelmingly.

“Don’t Stop Believin’” is a revealing, inspiring and fast-moving account of Cain’s life in and out of music.

Published in Cover Story
Wednesday, 28 December 2016 13:11

Thoughts on 2017’s Rock Hall inductions

Back in the Oct. 26 edition of The Maine Edge, I made a prediction about the 2017 class of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Out of 19 nominees selected, we were told that only five would actually be inducted during ceremonies next April. As it turns out, six names made the cut with a seventh added in a special category.

Published in Music

Examining the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 2017 nominees

Published in Music

There's a great memoir inside singer, songwriter and musician Gregg Rolie - if he could sit still long enough to write it.

Published in Cover Story
Wednesday, 25 May 2016 11:34

Rolling on the (Penobscot) River

Looking ahead at the summer's offerings from Waterfront Concerts

BANGOR Summer is here, which means that the concerts are coming to the Bangor waterfront.

Published in Cover Story
Wednesday, 03 October 2012 14:20

All things '80s

Iconic legends rock Bangor Waterfront

BANGOR  As the old Journey song says, "the party's over." As the leaves begin to fall, the Waterfront stage is heading to the ground - but not before Bangor rocked with Journey, Pat Benatar and Loverboy on Friday night.

Loverboy, famous for the early '80s staples "The Kid is Hot Tonight" and "Lovin' Every Minute of It," started the evening. The band's lead vocalist, Mike Reno, can still knock out the vocals. They wrapped up with "Working for the Weekend," a suitable choice indeed for a crowd happily standing in a cold drizzle.

Published in Music
Wednesday, 19 September 2012 14:48

Mike Reno of Loverboy Ready to rock Bangor

 80's rock band to appear with Journey and Pat Benatar

After 32 years, more than a dozen hits and sales of more than 20 million records, Loverboy is still going strong. Lead singer Mike Reno says the group's longevity can be attributed to the fact that they retain the bond that brought them together.

Loverboy's lineup has endured one change in its three decade history: the death of longtime bassist and Mike Reno's best friend Scott Smith in a boating accident.

Published in Music
Wednesday, 21 March 2012 17:20

'Play Journey': Meet stranger: cry?'

'Journey' is easy to be a jerk about. It's practically got the word 'art' sticky-noted onto its forehead. Maybe it looks better then a painting, if you don't look at paintings. Like all 'art games,' it does not focus on either substantial game mechanics or on a story; it's about an aesthetic (like all 'art games,' a pretty somber one) and it's about getting the 'player' to 'feel' 'something.' You can tell the developers actually used those words in interviews. It's that kind of game.

I'm not going to be a jerk, though, because 'Journey' is worth talking about, mostly for its really fascinating co-op ideas. Maybe you could argue for some value in it as a simple aural and visual piece, if you're that kind of guy, but without this multiplayer I don't see what more you'd get from playing it on a PS3 than from watching somebody else play it on YouTube.

Your journey is spent wandering through a desert and a cave, headed for some snow-capped mountain in the distance. Each area is a gentle bubble, wide open and populated by a handful of simple, ambiguous objects. There are no 'puzzles' per se, just a couple of structures, ideas or characters floating around for you to play with until you see how to move on - how to continue the journey. A really wonderful Cracker Jack cluster of ideas appears near the end, attaining that mythic balance between aural, visual and mechanical feedback to hit what feel, maybe, like a couple pretty genuine emotional notes.

Published in Tekk

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