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Less than four years separated Jimi Hendrix's first London recording session for 'Hey Joe' in October 1966 and his final studio visit, a mastering session with Bob Ludwig (now of Gateway Mastering in Portland) in August 1970. In that narrow window, Hendrix recorded a body of work that continues to surprise, inspire and influence generations of fans and musicians alike.  

Since 1995, when Experience Hendrix (then headed by the late Al Hendrix, Jimi's father) gained control of Jimi's musical legacy, his core music catalog has been restored and a series of carefully compiled and annotated albums has been issued, each offering a bounty of previously unavailable material. The latest is 'People, Hell and Angels,' a collection of 12 previously unreleased studio recordings from 1968 and 1969 due on March 5 from Experience Hendrix/Sony Legacy.

Published in Music

'Recording was a tremendous passion for him. He created this huge backlog of work.'

John McDermott, catalog manager and producer for Experience Hendrix

We think of him as the ber-cool, eternally youthful ultimate guitar hero, but next year will mark what would have been Jimi Hendrix's 70th birthday. For some fans, that's kind of a shocking thought. Even more incredible is just how much music he managed to record between his arrival in London in 1966 and his death in Sept., 1970 at the age of 27. It isn't merely the volume of music he committed to tape in those four years that is amazing, but that so much of it is of a consistently high quality.

Published in Buzz

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