Admin
Monday, 02 May 2022 11:36

‘Crush’ a charming teen romance

I love a love story. Always have. And it doesn’t really matter who is falling in love or where; so long as the tale is well told, I am happy to come along on a romantic journey.

What has been particularly, well, lovely to see is the steady growth of LGBTQ+ love stories. More and more, these relationships and the people in them are getting to see themselves reflected in popular culture, whether it’s in movies, books or TV shows. And as that growth continues, we’re slowly approaching the point where these stories don’t have to be defined by the types of relationship at their center.

Take “Crush,” the new film currently streaming on Hulu. Directed by Sammi Cohen from a script by Kristin King and Casey Rackham, “Crush” is a sweet and slightly raucous high school rom-com. It is funny and thoughtful, driven by compelling characters brought to life by strong performances. It is about falling for someone and then falling for someone else and not knowing what to do, all through a lens of teenage self-consciousness. It’s about friends and friendship and the mistakes we make when in pursuit of what we want … or what we THINK we want.

And yes, many of the characters in this film identify as queer, but that isn’t what the movie is ABOUT. The story being told here is universal, the feelings felt by these characters are ones that will ring familiar to anyone who has ever been in love, been in high school or been in love WHILE being in high school.

Published in Movies
Monday, 21 March 2022 15:21

‘Deep Water’ runs shallow

Every once in a while, a movie comes along that is especially fascinating because of the factors surrounding its making. Obviously, just about every film project comes with its share of drama – it’s the nature of the business – but occasionally, we get something where the extracurricular noise largely subsumes the work itself.

There is no better recent example of this phenomenon than “Deep Water,” the new erotic thriller currently streaming on Hulu. The film’s central pairing is Ben Affleck and Ana de Armas, whose real-life relationship’s tumultuous conclusion may well have gotten its start on this set. Not to mention the fact that director Adrian Lyne – an absolute legend in the realm of erotic thrillers – made this his first movie in two decades. The buzz surrounding the movie was far more prominent than that for the movie itself.

And with good reason, as it turns out.

“Deep Water” is a bizarre work of hot nonsense, at times bordering on the incomprehensible. The narrative is scattered, the performances are strange and the whole thing is campy in a way that makes it difficult to determine whether said campiness was actually intentional.

It is also, to be fair, a pretty good time, albeit a weird one.

Published in Movies
Monday, 07 March 2022 15:46

Meat-cute – ‘Fresh’

Just like everything else, the internet has fundamentally altered the dating world. With a multitude of dating apps out there, places where you can explore just about whatever romantic niche you’d like, the possibility of discovering someone new is high. But when it comes to making and maintaining a meaningful connection, well … that possibility is considerably lower.

All in all, it can be a real meat market out there, a metaphor taken to a grisly extreme in the new film “Fresh,” currently streaming on Hulu.

Directed by Mimi Cave from a script by Lauryn Kahn, “Fresh” is a dark satire of modern-day dating marked by a bloodily over-the-top premise (that I’m going to try hard not to spoil). It is a visceral and surprising film, one that takes great pleasure in subverting your expectations at multiple turns and punching up at a few worthwhile societal targets. Smart and sharp-witted, it’s a movie that really gives you something you can chew on.

Published in Movies

We live in a golden age of “thrillers based on books that were very popular a few years ago.” It’s such a prominent trope that Netflix even gave us a series parodying it just last month. And yet – there’s a reason that these books keep getting written and these movies keep getting made.

These stories have plenty of appeal. Sure, they might not be the most literarily challenging or narrative complex. They’re simply and straightforward, with enough variations on the fundamental themes to keep the guesses coming and the pages turning. Maybe you figure it out early, maybe you don’t, but ultimately, the journey is the point.

“No Exit,” a new film currently streaming on Hulu, fits the bill to a T. Based on the 2017 Taylor Adams novel of the same name, it’s a story about fear, strangers and the ramifications of trust (or a lack thereof). Small and self-contained, it’s a taut, brisk experience.

Now, a lot of what you see here will ring familiar, but director Damien Power does a solid job of shuffling the deck, dealing out a somewhat surprising hand with the same old cards. It’s a well-executed example of what it is, a solid thriller with a twisty narrative and some unexpected intensity.

Published in Movies
Monday, 17 January 2022 16:40

‘Sex Appeal’ is appealing enough

The relationship between teenagers and sex has long been a popular theme to be explored in movies. The discourse around that relationship has changed, to be sure, and the films have themselves changed accordingly. But rest assured – the teen sex comedy isn’t going anywhere.

That said, we’ve come a long way since films like “Porky’s” or even “American Pie.” Teenagers and their relationship to sex – and the viewing public’s relationship with that relationship – has continued to become something a bit more nuanced as time has passed.

“Sex Appeal,” a Hulu original offering directed by Talia Osteen from a script by Tate Hanyok, is an effort to engage with society’s ever-evolving perspective on teenage sexuality. While it doesn’t do much in the way of breaking new ground, it does manage to have some fun with the standard tropes of the genre and even trots out a few unexpected stylistic flourishes that elevate it somewhat beyond the usual standards of streaming teen fare. The end result is a film that might not be life-changing but is still a perfectly charming and funny way to spend some time.

Published in Movies

So there’s no denying the pop cultural ubiquity of Marvel these days. The MCU is going strong, with three films already in the past few months and another on the way in December. There has been a wealth of TV content as well, with three different TV shows hitting Disney+ at various points so far this year, with yes, another one on the way.

It’s a lot. And while I acknowledge that I am absolutely here for all of it, I’ll also concede that for those whose brains weren’t steeped in Marvel Comics for their entire adolescence, it might be too much.

That said, one of the perhaps unanticipated benefits of all this too-muchness is that some weird stuff can slip through the cracks and onto our screens.

This brings me to “Hit-Monkey,” the latest episodic offering by way of Hulu. The series – which dropped on November 17 – is an altogether bizarre one, an animated series that focuses on a revenge-fueled snow monkey carving a swath of bloody vengeance through the Japanese underworld as he looks to avenge the death of his tribe, all with the ghost of a wiseacre American assassin as his mentor/sidekick.

Like I said – weird. But perhaps the weirdest part of it all? It’s good. REALLY good.

(Note: All 10 episodes of the season were provided for review.)

Published in Buzz
Wednesday, 01 September 2021 11:43

‘Only Murders in the Building’ one killer show

Few pop culture phenomena have been as pervasive in recent years as true crime podcasts. Even if you don’t listen to them yourself, odds are that you know at least one person who listens obsessively to one or more. “Serial,” “My Favorite Murder,” “Dirty John, “Dr. Death” – the list goes on and on. Hell, the latter two pushed so fully into the zeitgeist that they got TV adaptations.

But while some of these programs have made the leap across media, a new Hulu show has a different idea about how to bring true crime podcasts to the small screen.

“Only Murders in the Building” is a 10-episode series on the streaming service; the first three episodes dropped on Aug. 31, with subsequent episodes landing every Tuesday from September 7 through October 5. The show was created by Steve Martin and Dan Fogelman; it stars Martin alongside Martin Short and Selena Gomez.

The fundamental question is simple – what if true crime enthusiasts were presented with an opportunity to go in-depth on a murder of their own? The result – thanks to great performances, strong writing and a genuine affection for the genre – is a show that is funny, smart and sincere, managing to parody this very specific world while also crafting a great example of that world.

(Note: Eight episodes of the show were made available for critics.)

Published in Style

Sometimes, we sit down in hopes of being challenged. We seek out art that causes us to ask questions and engage with larger ideas. We watch or we listen or we read in hopes of learning something new, or at least a new way of looking at something we already understand (or think we do). These are powerful artistic experiences, addressing something at our core.

Other times, we just want to escape. Maybe you want to laugh, maybe you want to be frightened, maybe you want a bunch of explosions. You’re not here for fundamental truths. You’re here for fart jokes and fistfights and jump scares.

Both experiences have real value. We want what we want when we want it – and that’s OK.

“Vacation Friends,” newly streaming on Hulu, is very much the latter sort of film. Directed by Clay Tarver from a screenplay Tarver co-wrote with Tom & Tim Mullen, Jonathan Goldstein and John Francis Daley, the comedy is a coarse trifle, a movie built solely around outrageous situations – getting into them, getting out of them, you know the drill.

There are a handful of charming moments here where things threaten to develop some sort of meaningful underpinning – bits where deeper themes of adult friendship and loyalty and the like bob briefly to the surface – but those are quickly drowned out by the nonsense.

It’s fun. Dumb fun. Unchallenging fun. But fun. And sometimes, that’s all you’re looking for.

Published in Movies

Haven’t you ever thought that the self-help and wellness realm is just a little … sinister?

We live in a world where the notion of improving one’s health – physical, emotional or otherwise – has become a billion-dollar industry. Yet we ALSO live in a world where, if there’s a way to make money through duplicitous and/or unsavory means, someone will do so.

Unsurprisingly, we’re seeing a lot of creative work that addresses that particular slice of the self-actualization pie.

The latest offering along those lines is “Nine Perfect Strangers,” the new limited series from Hulu. Created by John Henry Butterworth and television icon David E. Kelley and based on the 2018 novel of the same name by Liane Moriarty, the show offers a look at a secretive high-end wellness retreat that – surprise! – might be considerably more than it appears to be.

With an absolutely stacked cast – Nicole Kidman leads the way, but there are exceptional talents scattered all over the call sheet – and a setting that looks both bucolic and expensive, the show has a lot going for it. And when you toss some weird and mysterious narrative developments into the mix, well … you’ve got something.

I’ll put it this way: for the most part, “Nine Perfect Strangers” gets the dosage just right.

Published in Buzz

I’ll be the first to admit that I’m not a music guy. For whatever reason, music had never resonated with me in the way it did so many of my otherwise like-minded peers. It wasn’t my thing. But sometimes, I’d experience something that would give me a clearer sense of that passion.

Maybe it was a song I heard at a party or at a bar. Maybe I was sitting in a theater – movie or stage. Maybe it was someone feverishly proselytizing about a band they loved that I’d never heard of. Maybe someone showed me “Stop Making Sense.” Maybe it was as simple as: “You need to hear this.”

I always cherish those moments when I have them, the gooseflesh-raising instances when music gets inside me.

“Summer of Soul” was one of those moments.

Published in Style
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 Next > End >>
Page 1 of 4

Advertisements

The Maine Edge. All rights reserved. Privacy policy. Terms & Conditions.

Website CMS and Development by Links Online Marketing, LLC, Bangor Maine