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One of the joys of living in Maine is the wide array of environments you can enjoy. There’s the ocean, of course. There are mountains and forests. Lovely cities and idyllic small towns. Cold winters and warm summers. Few places run the gamut like the state of Maine.

That variety of place is reflected in the types of stories told about the place. We’ve got the Master of Horror, of course – hi, Mr. King! – but storytellers embrace all manner of genres, using the assortment of settings to bring to life literary fiction, sci-fi, mysteries, thrillers … the list goes on and on.

Every once in a while, though, you get a book that marries setting, style and story via that Maine lens that just clicks.

That’s what Adam White has done with his debut novel “The Midcoast” (Hogarth, $27), a crime drama that offers up a compelling story while also exploring the definitions of success in a small town. It is a taut, sharp thriller – one that balances the stressors of its storyline with the underlying laconicism that marks life on Maine’s coast.

It’s well-crafted and propulsive, a fast read that sweeps the reader along into its wake, pulling us into the disparate lives of the characters at its center.

Published in Style

There are few things that I more eagerly anticipate as a reader than the imminent arrival of the latest installment in the Hogarth Shakespeare series of books. These reimaginings of Shakespeare’s works by contemporary novelists have been among the most consistently innovative and engaging books of the past decade. My loves for both the Bard and for new fiction are sated simultaneously, thanks to Hogarth’s grand plan.

The latest offering – the seventh in the series – is “Macbeth” (Hogarth Shakespeare, $27), a take on the tragedy by Norwegian noir superstar Jo Nesbo and one more in a lengthy line of successes from the series.

Published in Style
Wednesday, 11 October 2017 13:49

Unhappy new Lear - ‘Dunbar’

Edward St. Aubyn reimagines Shakespeare’s “King Lear”

Published in Buzz
Wednesday, 24 May 2017 11:13

Monkey bars and green-eyed monsters

Chevalier’s “New Boy” retells “Othello” on the playground

Published in Buzz
Wednesday, 12 October 2016 12:13

The I of the storm - 'Hag-Seed'

Atwood novel an exploration of Shakespeare's 'The Tempest'

William Shakespeare is the literary GOAT. Not a particularly controversial take, to be sure, but one in which I strongly believe. The Bard is the best and no one will convince me otherwise.

Published in Style
Wednesday, 29 June 2016 12:47

A shrew renewed - 'Vinegar Girl'

Anne Tyler novel reimagines 'The Taming of the Shrew'

Perhaps no author has ever been interpreted and reinterpreted as often as William Shakespeare. The universality of the tales told by the Bard open the door for a wide variety of different perspectives.

Published in Buzz

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