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Tuesday, 19 November 2019 11:55

‘Charlie’s Angels’ get their wings

Did we really need another “Charlie’s Angels” movie?

It’s not surprising, really; the basic concept is certainly ripe for revisiting in this current era of IP-driven franchise-building. And in case you’re wondering, yes – this new film is intended as a sequel of sorts to the two “Charlie’s Angels” films from 15 years ago, rather than a reboot.

But the question remains: why?

That said, the actual result is better than it has any right to be. Not great, but OK. It’s probably safe to assume that much of the credit for that has to go to Elizabeth Banks, who not only directed the film but also makes her feature debut as a screenwriter. Oh, and she’s in it as well. So yeah – this is very much an Elizabeth Banks joint.

Published in Movies

It took all of one weekend for it to be clear that there would be a sequel to 2014’s “The Lego Movie.” It was embraced by audiences of all ages and made just an absolute crapload of money – almost $470 million all told – so making another was a no-brainer.

The danger, however, is that capturing that kind of lightning in a bottle twice isn’t easy. There were elements of the original that simply could not be replicated – would a sequel still be able to resonate with audiences?

Ultimately, “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part” is able to answer that question with a “yes.” The sequel – directed by Mike Mitchell, although Christopher Miller and Phil Lord (who directed the first film) did the screenplay – shares a sensibility with the original; while it doesn’t quite manage the same degree of emotional resonance, the jokes come fast and furious and the cast is as top-notch as ever.

Published in Movies

I’ve always loved the Muppets. From their anarchic weirdo beginnings through every family-friendly iteration that followed, I was all in on Jim Henson’s fuzzy felted creations … though I always had a stronger connection to their darker side, whether it was overt or subtly lingering just beneath the surface.

“The Happytime Murders,” produced by Henson Alternative, the adult-oriented arm of the company, is very much connected to that darker side. Oh, and it’s definitely overt – this movie is a lot of things, but subtle is not one of them. Brian Henson, son of the legendary puppeteer, directs from a screenplay by Todd Berger.

It’s a comic noir vision of a world in which puppets and humans exist side by side, packed with foul language and incessant innuendo. It is a film that revels in its tastelessness, unafraid to get down and really wallow in the mire. It is coarse and crass and not for everyone.

As you might have guessed, I dug it.

Published in Movies
Wednesday, 29 March 2017 11:55

Go go ‘Power Rangers’

Kiddie action reboot flawed, but sort of fun

Published in Movies
Wednesday, 23 May 2012 15:03

Exactly what I expected

What to Expect When You're Expecting' cliched and contrived

I've learned to be leery of films that trumpet their all-star casts. These ensemble rom-coms (they're always rom-coms unless Stallone is involved, anyway) feature more name talents than you can count on both hands, but they also run the danger of having too much of a good thing. The tendency with big-name casts is to try desperately to get everyone as much screen time as possible. This leads to multiple storylines with forced connections between them featuring a whole mess of characters that we as an audience simply don't have time to care about.

This leads to 'What to Expect When You're Expecting.'

Ostensibly based on the 1984 pregnancy advice book of the same name, the movie follows a number of couples as they feel their respective ways through the minefield that is pregnancy. There's Wendy (Elizabeth Banks, 'The Hunger Games') and Gary (Ben Falcone, 'Bridesmaids'), a couple that finally gets pregnant after years of trying. Celebrity trainer Jules (Cameron Diaz, 'Bad Teacher') met Evan (Matthew Morrison, TV's 'Glee') on a reality dance competition and wound up pregnant. Holly (Jennifer Lopez, 'The Back-Up Plan') and Alex (Rodrigo Santoro, 'Rio') can't conceive, so they're going through the adoption process.

Published in Movies

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