Admin

I love being surprised at the movies. In this day of franchise fodder and omnipresent trailers, it can sometimes be tough to go into a film with little in the way of preconception. So when the opportunity arises, it can be really rewarding.

Writer-director David Lowery’s new film “The Green Knight” was just such a rewarding experience for me. It’s based on the 14th century chivalric romance “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,” but beyond that and the knowledge that the wonderful Dev Patel stars, all I knew was what I half-remembered from having read the original text some 30 years ago. So I didn’t really know what was coming.

What I got was a sumptuous visual feast, an aesthetic wonder; it’s truly beautiful to look at. The central performance is exquisite, which is key – anything less than excellence from your lead and this film simply collapses under its own weight. That’s mostly because it is also one of the most actively weird mainstream releases I’ve seen in some time – and that’s a good thing.

It is a fantastic and strange tale of a man set upon a journey he doesn’t fully understand, victimized by his own hubris even as he ventures through a world that is steadily shifting around him. It is a story of the difference between responsibility and obligation, between honor and shame, all playing out through the eyes of a lone knight on a quest whose seeming purpose slowly crumbles with each step forward.

Published in Movies

Recounting real-life stories in movies is complicated business. The filmmakers must decide where to strike the balance between historical veracity and dramatic license – and the line moves. Finding the proper offset between telling the truth and telling a story is tough when that tipping point is in different places. The best docudramas are the ones that toe the line without crossing it, finding the correct distribution of truth and fiction for a particular film.

Making a movie such as “Hotel Mumbai,” a retelling of the real-life 2008 Mumbai attacks focusing on the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel, demands that delicacy of touch. Not only was this a huge tragedy, but a brutal and violent one; it’s an event that demands sensitivity in its presentation, yet also requires a certain bluntness to be truthful. Director Anthony Maras – who also co-wrote the screenplay with John Collee – had to step carefully.

And for the most part, he did so.

This is an undeniably tense and unexpectedly graphic account of what happened in those hours. While there are moments that skate up to the edge of exploitation, Maras manages to avoid crossing those lines. The visceral brutality of the film is, by most accounts, true to life. And the starkness of the violence allows the moments of selflessness and heroism to stand out the more.

Published in Movies

Advertisements

The Maine Edge. All rights reserved. Privacy policy. Terms & Conditions.

Website CMS and Development by Links Online Marketing, LLC, Bangor Maine