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Tuesday, 12 November 2019 12:44

‘Midway’ tries to fight the good fight

The Battle of Midway is considered one of the major turning points in World War II. The victory by U.S. forces over the Japanese Navy prevented Japan from taking control of the Pacific Ocean and bringing devastation to America’s west coast. The United States was outnumbered and outgunned, but thanks to the bravery of the men in the fight and the brilliance of those plotting the course, they emerged victorious.

It’s an obvious choice to receive the cinematic treatment. Indeed, the battle was the namesake of a star-studded 1976 film. Now, over 40 years after that film and over 70 since the battle itself, moviegoers are getting another look at that historic fight on the big screen.

Too bad it isn’t a better movie.

Director Roland Emmerich, whose name has become a kind of shorthand for big-budget Hollywood films that are heavy on the explosions and light on the … everything else, brings us “Midway.” While he certainly understands the spectacle that comes with war movies, he doesn’t quite capture the subtler aspects of the story the way one might hope.

It’s not that the film is bad, per se – it’s just a bit heavy-handed, both in terms of the CGI battle scenes and the interpersonal relationships. To his credit, Emmerich has assembled a talented cast that is able to somewhat alleviate the issues with both his direction and Wes Tooke’s screenplay, lending the proceedings a depth that otherwise wouldn’t be there. The end result is a moviegoing experience that is fine, but no more than that.

It’s a story that warrants telling; it’s just too bad that it isn’t better told.

Published in Movies

Full disclosure: I love dogs. Love love LOVE dogs. I love the teeny tiny puppers and the big thick doggos and all the adorable floofs out there.

Being the font of canine adoration that I am, it’s clear that I fit squarely into the target demographic of “A Dog’s Journey,” the sequel to 2017’s “A Dog’s Purpose.” It’s the story of one good boy’s spirit as he lives multiple lives, all of them focused on doing right by the one he is sworn to watch over – a duty whose subject changes in this sequel.

(It’s worth noting that while there’s no in-movie connection between these two movies and “A Dog’s Way Home” from earlier this year, all three films are based on novels by the writer W. Bruce Cameron, so don’t be shocked by tonal or thematic similarities.)

It’s a chance to follow one dog’s devoted spirit seek endlessly to track down the person that they are meant to protect, no matter what. It isn’t always easy, but a good dog will do whatever it takes. And since they’re ALL good dogs, well … they’re going to make it happen.

Published in Movies
Wednesday, 08 May 2019 11:24

Home sweet home - ‘The Intruder’

With the “Avengers: Endgame” monolith dominating the box office as expected, the big-screen offerings of early May were always going to be a bit offbeat. Studios were aware that specifically-aimed counterprogramming would be the only way to ride out the massive second and third weekends from the MCU juggernaut.

But no one could have expected something like “The Intruder,” a weird little bit of B-movie genre filmmaking featuring a pulpy blend of thriller themes and a delightfully bonkers performance from Dennis Quaid. It is unapologetic and unrelenting in its choices, committing fully to a mess of stalker/home invasion tropes sprinkled with periodic moments of intentional unintentional comedy.

Basically, if you could distill the desire to shout “Don’t go in there!” at a movie screen and turn it into an actual movie, you’d pretty much have “The Intruder.”

Published in Movies
Wednesday, 05 September 2018 10:41

Brothers in arms – ‘Kin’

It’s always interesting to watch a feature debut. Seeing first-time directors and/or writers take their initial bow in the world of mainstream cinema … it’s bearing witness to the realization of what is almost certainly a lifelong dream. Maybe it’s an effort that promises future excellence. Maybe it’s even a fully-formed masterpiece. But really, it’s likely to be flawed and uneven, alternating quality with rookie mistakes.

The new film “Kin” definitely falls into that last category.

The movie – directed by twin brothers Jonathan and Josh Baker and based on their own 2014 short film “Bag Man” – is an ambitious effort, an attempt to bring family drama and science fiction together. Unfortunately, while there are shining examples from both ends of the spectrum, the combination never really meshes the way it needs to, despite its surprisingly robust cast and intriguing concept.

Published in Movies
Wednesday, 01 February 2017 14:05

Must love dogs – ‘A Dog’s Purpose’

Canines far outshine human co-stars

Published in Movies
Wednesday, 30 January 2013 14:20

The many mistakes of Movie 43'

Compilation of shorts short on laughs

When I first saw the trailer for 'Movie 43,' my attention was grabbed. A series of loosely-connected comedic short films created by a team of name writers and directors and packed with recognizable stars? The potential was sky high.

Unfortunately, however, the end result is far, far less than the sum of its parts.

Published in Movies

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