Admin

Posted by

Mike Dow Mike Dow
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

edge staff writer

Share

Robert Irvine says he came down with Covid and came out fighting

Rate this item
(1 Vote)
Chef Robert Irvine lands at Kualoa Ranch on the island of O'ahu for an episode of The Food Network's "Dinner Impossible." Irvine says the show, where is expected to prepare a meal for a large group of arriving guests by foraging from the land and sea is "the hardest thing I've ever done in my life." New episodes air Thursdays at 10pm after "Restaurant Impossible." Chef Robert Irvine lands at Kualoa Ranch on the island of O'ahu for an episode of The Food Network's "Dinner Impossible." Irvine says the show, where is expected to prepare a meal for a large group of arriving guests by foraging from the land and sea is "the hardest thing I've ever done in my life." New episodes air Thursdays at 10pm after "Restaurant Impossible." (Image courtesy of The Food Network)

Chef and Food Network host Robert Irvine has returned to two of the channel’s most popular programs, including the show that he cited as “the most difficult thing I’ve ever done in my life.”

“Restaurant Impossible,” where Irvine and his crew attempt to rescue struggling eateries is back with new episodes Thursdays at 9:00 p.m.

At 10 p.m., Irvine can be seen in the first new episodes of “Dinner Impossible” in more than a decade. Irvine says the show is “raw and real” as he is expected to cook against the clock in unusual locations with a near-total lack of supplies at the ready.

The programs can be seen on the Food Network and the Discovery Plus streaming platform.

Irvine said “Dinner Impossible” has presented him with the biggest challenges of his life.

“When you’re forced to scavenge for food from the land or sea, and you’re pitted against the challenges of weather, and of producers trying to mess you up, you’re faced with real aggravation in real time,” Irvine said.

The British-born celebrity chef and restaurateur admits he does become a little testy on “Dinner Impossible” as he attempts to prepare the sort of meal he expects out of restaurants featured on “Restaurant Impossible” with virtually nothing to work with.

“It can get frustrating and I admit to getting a little intense,” Irvine said. “They (the producers) want me to fail and I try everything within the rules to beat them. I have failed in the past, these are tough challenges, and I do everything I can not to lose.”

Last week’s opening episode of a limited four episode return for “Dinner Impossible” dropped Irvine at Kualoa Ranch on the Hawaiian island of Oahu.

“I had to go fishing, shrimping, and foraging for food wherever I could find it,” Irvine said of the challenge. “It’s hard enough to put together a feast for a large group with no supplies but to create one that passes their flavor test is very difficult, I can assure you.”

Since the beginning of the pandemic, Irvine says he has been traveling the country to assist struggling restaurants, especially mom-and-pop eateries, he said.

“In some cases, it means a new coat of paint or it could mean a complete overhaul of the business,” he said of “Restaurant Impossible,” the show where he visits eateries on the edge of going under, armed with a $10,000 budget, a renovation crew, if needed, and only two days to turn the business around.

Irvine says he was forced to stop, briefly, when he was hospitalized for six days with Covid-19 last July.

“I came out and started fighting for every small business owner in the country with the Food Network on two buses,” he said. “We hit 39 restaurants by Christmas and we started again on January 6.”

Irvine said he was up late the night before this interview took place wrapping an episode of “Restaurant Impossible,” and was hosting his crew at his home before they headed out to help another restaurant in need the following day.

Irvine urges his viewers to keep supporting all small businesses that are following safety protocols, including restaurants. He said he believes we will see a return to “somewhat normal” by the end of the year at the latest.

“It’s coming back and I implore everyone, listen to me, you have to believe, you have to trust, and feel comfortable when you go to these restaurants,” he said.

Irvine urges diners continue to support restaurants that are doing everything to stay safe and sanitary.

“And not just restaurants, but hairdressers and other small businesses that provide things we need in our life,” he said.

“My job, and that of the Food Network, and our team, is to go out and touch as many mom-and-pop operations as possible to lift them back up.”

Last modified on Wednesday, 17 March 2021 09:13

Advertisements

The Maine Edge. All rights reserved. Privacy policy. Terms & Conditions.

Website CMS and Development by Links Online Marketing, LLC, Bangor Maine