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Weird National Briefs (02/17/2021)

February 17, 2021
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Otherwise engaged

ORANGE CITY, Fla. (AP) — A Florida man stole an engagement ring and wedding bands from a girlfriend and used them to propose to another girlfriend, according to authorities.

Volusia County Sheriff’s deputies said Thursday they have issued an arrest warrant for Joseph Davis, 48, who had not been found as of Friday.

Their investigation started earlier this year when a woman from Orange City, Florida, told detectives she had discovered her boyfriend was actually engaged to someone else. When she looked up the fiancée’s Facebook page, she noticed a photo of her wearing a wedding band and engagement ring that was identical to her own from a prior marriage, the sheriff’s office said in a news release.

When the Orange City woman checked her jewelry box, she found her rings were missing, as were several other pieces of jewelry, including a diamond ring that belonged to her grandmother. The total value of the stolen property was about $6,270, according to the sheriff’s office.

Orange City is located halfway between Orlando and Daytona Beach.

The Orange City woman reached out to the fiancee, who returned some of the items, and they both called it off with Davis, who also went by the names “Joe Brown” and “Marcus Brown,” the sheriff’s office said.

The fiancee, who lives in Orlando, told detectives she had been duped too.

Davis once took the fiancee to a house that actually belonged to the Orange City woman, while she was at work, and claimed it was his. He then asked the fiancee to move in with him, but he then disappeared. By that time, the fiancee discovered her laptop computer and jewelry were missing, the sheriff’s office said.

Even though they did not have his real name, the jilted women remembered he had a relative in North Carolina and detectives were able to track down the relative who identified Davis, according to the sheriff’s office.

Davis has an active arrest warrant for a hit-and-run crash with injuries in Oregon, and previously has been arrested for possession of fictitious ID, filing a false police report, domestic assault and possession of cocaine with intent to sell, the sheriff’s office said.

According to the sheriff’s office, the jail where Davis previously was booked noted he had a tattoo on his left arm that said, “Only God can judge me.”

TME – Something borrowed indeed.

Ever dog has its day

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — It won’t be a dog’s life for a Tennessee canine whose owner recently died.

Lulu, an 8-year-old border collie, will be living the good life in Nashville after inheriting $5 million in her owner’s will, WTVF-TV reported.

Martha Burton, Lulu’s caretaker, told the station Lulu’s owner, Bill Dorris, was a successful businessman who wasn’t married and died late last year. His will states the money should be put into a trust for Lulu’s care. It allows for Burton to be reimbursed for reasonable monthly expenses in the care of Lulu.

“He just really loved the dog,” said Burton, who was friends with Dorris and would take care of the dog when he traveled.

She says she doesn’t know if she could ever spend $5 million on Lulu.

“Well, I’d like to try,” she said with a smile.

Dorris owned land along Interstate 65 where a controversial statue of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest is located. The fate of the statue and the rest of the estate may be determined in probate court, the news outlet reported.

TME – Get ready for the dog version of “Knives Out.”

AWOL chicken

CULLMAN, Ala. (AP) — A Mississippi teen who lost his Civil War-reenacting pet chicken Peep outside a Cracker Barrel restaurant in Alabama was reunited with the bird courtesy of a farmer who helped find the fowl.

Thomas Ramsey, who founded a military reenactment group for youth, told The Cullman Times he was headed home from a weekend event at Spring Hill, Tennessee, when he stopped with a friend at the restaurant in Cullman on Jan. 31. He left Peep, a rooster that participates in simulated battles, tied to his truck in the parking lot.

Ramsey, 18, said he and his friend walked out about an hour later to discover the chicken had flown the coop and was nowhere to be seen.

“I went back into the Cracker Barrel and it was very hard for me to say this with a straight face, even though I was panicking: ‘Do you have cameras in the parking lot? I think someone stole my chicken,’” said Ramsey, of Copiah County south of Jackson.

Someone overheard and said they had seen Peep wandering in the parking lot. An animal control officer got involved in the hunt and “missing chicken” photos of Peep soon spread on social media pages around Cullman, a city of about 16,000 people 50 miles (80 kilometers) north of Birmingham.

With no sign of Peep, Ramsey continued the drive home. Then he got a message that the bird had been found outside the Cracker Barrel and farmer John Watson, who posted advice on catching Peep, had the rooster and was headed to Birmingham to meet Ramsey for a reunion.

“I believe in paying it forward,” said Watson. “God has blessed my family so much throughout the years, I believe we should be kind to our fellow man. Yes, it was ‘just a chicken,’ but it was his and he clearly cared for it.”

Ramsey said Civil War soldiers sometimes had animals with them on the battlefield, so he takes Peep to reenactments. During the first one Peep attended, he said, the bird got out of a bag and wandered around during simulated battle.

“There’s about 10 cannons just blazing and all the rifle fire and he’s not going crazy. He’s pretty chill,” Ramsey said.

TME – He served under Colonel Sanders.

Koala kaos

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — A koala has been rescued after causing a five-car pileup while trying to cross a six-lane freeway in southern Australia.

Police said the crash in heavy Monday morning traffic in the city of Adelaide caused some injuries but no one required an ambulance.

The animal’s rescuer said she got out of her car to investigate what had caused the pileup. Nadia Tugwell, with her coat in hand, teamed up with a stranger clutching a blanket in a bid to capture the marsupial. A concrete highway divider had blocked the koala’s crossing.

“The koala was absolutely not damaged in any way,” Tugwell said. “It was very active, but very calm.”

Once the koala was in her trunk, Tugwell drove to a gas station to turn the animal over to wildlife rescuers. In the interim, the koala was able to climb from the trunk into her SUV’s cabin.

“It decided to come to the front toward me, so I said, ‘OK, you stay here. I’ll get out,’” she said.

“It started sitting for a while on the steering wheel: (as if) saying: ‘let’s go for a drive,’ and that’s when I started taking photos,” she added.

Tugwell said she had learned from past experience how to calm koalas by covering their eyes. She lives near a eucalyptus forest outside Adelaide and has twice called animal handlers to rescue koalas injured in fights with other koalas.

“I live up in the hills, and if you let them do what they want to do and you don’t chase them or something, they’re OK,” Tugwell said.

The leather trimmings of her luxury vehicle were scratched by the animal, but Tugwell said the happy ending was well worth the damage.

The koala later was released in a forest — well away from the freeway.

TME – I assumed Australia just let koalas drive.

There’s the beef!

LaPORTE, Ind. (AP) — A herd of about 75 Holstein calves barreled down an Indiana highway after escaping a nearby farm.

Capt. Derek Allen, an off-duty officer who happened to be nearby in his department police car, quickly made a U-turn Saturday when he witnessed the cows running by in LaPorte County.

“It’s really important to note, these cows weren’t just walking, they were at a full gallop, if you will,” Allen told the South Bend Tribune.

He quickly got in front of the herd and drove ahead with his police lights flashing in order to warn oncoming traffic.

Allen, along with LaPorte County Det. Jim Fish, as well as a number of volunteer firefighters and other onlookers, began corralling the calves as they moved south.

“I’ve been involved in many unique situations previously, but not something with this many animals on the roadway,” Allen said.

While few cows were rounded up near a fenced area between CR 600 and CR 700 South, the majority of the herd continued to move onto Range Road — a few miles north of Kingsford Heights.

Eventually, all the cows are accounted for, Allen said, and no injuries were reported to the human onlookers or the cattle.

TME – I herd they were on the moo-ve.

Last modified on Wednesday, 17 February 2021 07:58

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