Admin

Posted by

Mike Dow Mike Dow
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

edge staff writer

Share

Victoria Gotti talks new docudrama ‘My Father’s Daughter’

Rate this item
(0 votes)
Victoria Gotti, daughter of the late mob-boss John Gotti, says her new Lifetime movie, "My Father's Daughter," gave her a chance to correct myths about her family and upbringing. "People have this fantasy theatrical concept of what my life must have been like. I wanted to clear that up with this movie – the way people assume we were raised. That was not my life." Victoria Gotti, daughter of the late mob-boss John Gotti, says her new Lifetime movie, "My Father's Daughter," gave her a chance to correct myths about her family and upbringing. "People have this fantasy theatrical concept of what my life must have been like. I wanted to clear that up with this movie – the way people assume we were raised. That was not my life." (Image courtesy of Lifetime)

Victoria Gotti says co-writing the screenplay for Lifetime’s new biopic “Victoria Gotti: My Father’s Daughter” gave her an opportunity to set the record straight on a number of misconceptions about her life (as portrayed by Chelsea Frei) as the daughter of the late mob boss, John Gotti (played by Maurice Benard).

Gotti also served as executive producer and narrator for the movie, which premiered last month and is available anytime on demand.

Victoria Gotti checked in with The Maine Edge to discuss challenges she overcame to make the movie, myths about her upbringing and a memory of her dad that she holds dear.

The Maine Edge: You say you worked closely with Chelsea and Maurice on this movie. How close did they come to getting it right?

Gotti: Very close. At the beginning, Maurice was having a little trouble getting into the role and he we talked about how important the role was to him. He was feeling a little intimidated and was looking for some direction. He asked what advice I could give him.

I looked at him and said “I can give it to you in one sentence. Think more Michael Corleone in ‘The Godfather’ than Tony Soprano in ‘The Sopranos.’”

He looked at me and said, “Got it – thank you.” He says that is the best advice he received.

The Maine Edge: This movie is based in part on your book “This Family of Mine: What it Was Like Growing Up Gotti,” published in 2009. Was that book challenging to write?

Gotti: The movie is very loosely based on the book. I wanted it to be something fresh and different. The book was really about my family as a whole and growing up in that world. This movie is about my life and what you see is through that lens from the age of five all the way up to my dad’s death and the impact he had in my life.

The Maine Edge: How would you describe your relationship with your father?

Gotti: I think it was a complex relationship. It wasn’t all cookies and cream. It wasn’t a bad relationship; it was just very complex. People are going to be very surprised by this movie because they will learn things they never knew. I think it’s long overdue.

The Maine Edge: Did this movie give you a chance to correct any misconceptions the public at large may have about you, your father or your family?

Gotti: Oh yes. For one – this word “Mafia princess.” Princess? When I was growing up, a princess was someone you read about that led a life of leisure without a care in the world and had everything her heart desired handed to her. We grew up dirt poor. It was anything but the life of a princess.

People assume I was driven to school in a bulletproof limousine surrounded by all of these men. They would actually say that to me. What? We lived across the street from the school. I used to get up each morning and get dressed and literally run across the street to go to school.

People have this fantasy theatrical concept of what my life must have been like. I wanted to clear that up with this movie – the way people assume we were raised. That was not my life.

The Maine Edge: Very few of us will ever see a dramatized version of our lives play out on a screen. Could you describe what it feels like to see other people acting out your story?

Gotti: Oh my goodness, it is strange. I had to leave the room twice when I was watching the rough cut of the movie for the first time. It was very surreal. It’s my life on the screen. I purged in this film. I mean brutal honesty. I think what you see is something you don’t even get a sense of when I was writing the book. This was life for me. As I was writing the screenplay, I had to get up and walk away – sometimes for hours; sometimes for days.

The Maine Edge: Most everyone that has lost a parent has a series of memories of that person that they hold onto. Is there one connected to your dad that you could share?

Gotti: When I’m having my worst days, I think about this over and over again. After I lost my daughter – she was stillborn – no one could comfort me. No one could rationalize it to me. I’ll never forget when my father walked in that hospital room door. He said “I’ve always said to you – you never cry over the small things in life. You save those tears for something real.” He looked at me and said, “Now it’s real, go ahead.” He just let me rip and I needed that so much.

Advertisements

Website CMS and Development by Links Online Marketing, LLC, Bangor Maine