Admin
Mike Dow

Mike Dow

edge staff writer

Website URL:

Wednesday, 17 April 2013 10:10

Inside Record Store Day

50,000,000 music fans can't be wrong  

It's one of the biggest parties in all of music, and this year's celebration promises to be the most impressive to date. On Saturday, April 20, music lovers around the world will come together for Record Store Day, an event that has grown beyond even its creator's wildest imagination.   

In 2007, Chris Brown, head of marketing for nine Bull Moose stores in Maine and two in New Hampshire, came up with the idea of setting aside a special day to celebrate independently owned record stores and the customers who love to inhabit them. Five hundred stores around the country liked the idea enough to join for the event's inaugural in 2008, and within four years the party had blown wide open with more than 1,500 stores in 21 countries on five continents taking part. 

It was a horrific crime that made national headlines in 1989; a young woman, jogging late at night through New York City's Central Park, was brutally raped and left to die. After a media-fueled public furor, five young black and Hispanic boys were arrested and interrogated for 30 hours.  Four of the boys confessed to the crime but in a shocking twist 12 years later, the actual rapist, already serving a life sentence for other crimes, admitted that he committed the crime alone which was confirmed with DNA evidence.

Guitarist Gary Rossington, founding member of Southern rock pioneers Lynyrd Skynyrd, feels like the last of a dying breed. 'When you look at all of the bands - especially from the South - that were around when we started, there aren't many of us left,' he told me in a recent phone conversation. 

As the sole original member in the current Skynyrd lineup, Rossington may also have been referencing his own role in the band. The October 1977 plane crash that killed original Skynyrd lead vocalist and lyricist Ronnie Van Zant, guitarist Steve Gaines and singer and vocalist Cassie Gaines, signaled the end of the Skynyrd name for a decade. Rossington spent years recovering from the crash that shattered both of his arms, legs, wrists, ankles and pelvis. A broken heart took longer to heal. 

Bringing with him a musical legacy stretching back to the mid '60s, Dave Mason says he's looking forward to returning to Maine. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee and founding member of Traffic will bring his trio to Portland for a show at Asylum on Saturday, March 30.  

'It's been a while since we've been up that way,' Mason told me in a phone interview last week. 'Maine is a beautiful state.'   

Raekwon, one of the most successful and celebrated artists in rap and hip hop, will bring 'The Lost Jewlry Tour' to Bangor on Thursday, March 28, for one performance at Tantrum Nightclub and Lounge on 193 Broad Street.  

Raekwon (his real name is Corey Woods) joined the nine-member Wu-Tang Clan in 1992 and helped shape their first major label release 'Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)' issued by Loud/RCA the following year. To date, recordings by the group and its individual members have accumulated more than 17 million in combined sales.

Less than four years separated Jimi Hendrix's first London recording session for 'Hey Joe' in October 1966 and his final studio visit, a mastering session with Bob Ludwig (now of Gateway Mastering in Portland) in August 1970. In that narrow window, Hendrix recorded a body of work that continues to surprise, inspire and influence generations of fans and musicians alike.  

Since 1995, when Experience Hendrix (then headed by the late Al Hendrix, Jimi's father) gained control of Jimi's musical legacy, his core music catalog has been restored and a series of carefully compiled and annotated albums has been issued, each offering a bounty of previously unavailable material. The latest is 'People, Hell and Angels,' a collection of 12 previously unreleased studio recordings from 1968 and 1969 due on March 5 from Experience Hendrix/Sony Legacy.

If one were to distill the feeling and vibe of coastal Maine and turn it into a radio station, what would it sound like? Maine radio veteran Race Ashlyn asked that question before creating Coastal Maine Radio a new online station designed to reflect the eclecticism of the coast and the people who spend time there. 

Originally from Waterville, Ashlyn says he has always had a fascination with the coast. 'I've always loved it. Even as a teenager, I would load up the car with friends and we'd drive to Pemaquid or Camden there's a vibe that you can only get on the coast,' Ashlyn told me in an interview last week.   

Wednesday, 13 February 2013 14:13

Debbie Gibson accentuates the positive

When she was 16 years old, Debbie Gibson wrote, produced and recorded her first album for Atlantic Records, 'Out of the Blue,' a debut that spawned five top-40 hits and made her one of the major success stories of the '80s. One of those hits, 'Foolish Beat,' landed Gibson in the Guinness Book of World Records, when she became the youngest artist to write, produce and perform a Billboard #1 single. She retains the record for being the youngest female to do so.  

From the outside, Gibson appeared to be an overnight success, but she recalls the years of rejection that lead her to that moment. 'I was rejected from Star Search' literally 10 times. I auditioned over the course of the entire run of that show and I never made it not once,' Gibson told me in a recent phone interview.   

Wednesday, 06 February 2013 13:04

Riveting new Springsteen bio receives Boss' input

(Bruce) said, 'If you found out anything about me that you didn't put in the book because you thought it might make me uncomfortable go back and put it in.'

You feel that you can almost reach out, touch Bruce Springsteen and hear his nervous laugh within the pages of 'Bruce,' an absorbing new biography by Peter Ames Carlin, published by Simon & Schuster, Inc.  

Carlin's previous bios of Paul McCartney and Brian Wilson generally succeeded in shining light on subjects for whom new information was thought to be exhausted, and he does it again in 'Bruce.' The book retains its 'unauthorized' status despite Springsteen's unusual decision to participate.

'The odds of me composing a symphony were one in a hundred thousand. It's never been done before like this.' Alby Hurwit, composer, retired radiologist.

Sometimes you get a second chance in life. In 'Lifecasters,' a new film for PBS from executive producers Aron Gaudet and Gita Pullapilly, the duo behind 2009's award winning documentary 'The Way We Get By,' we meet three very different people who attempt to beat the odds and realize their true purpose later in life.

<< Start < Prev 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 Next > End >>
Page 56 of 63

Advertisements

The Maine Edge. All rights reserved. Privacy policy. Terms & Conditions.

Website CMS and Development by Links Online Marketing, LLC, Bangor Maine