Admin

There’s a big difference between literary fame and literary greatness.

There are plenty of writers who are great without being famous and more than a few who are famous without being great. A very specific confluence of circumstances is required for an author to achieve both. But even the greatest, most famous writers come to the end of their story.

Terri-Lynne DeFino’s novel “The Bar Harbor Retirement Home for Famous Writers (and Their Muses)” (William Morrow, $15.99) takes a speculative look at what that ending might look like, creating a vividly detailed place where literary giants might spend their final days, swapping stories and generally accepting that the heady heights of their younger days are permanently behind them.

Published in Style
Tuesday, 17 April 2018 14:50

Hard-boiled hilarity – ‘Noir’

If you were to put together a short list of the consistently funniest authors currently working, Christopher Moore would be on it. Probably near the top. His books are smart and absurd, packed with dynamic characters and engaging storytelling. He has tackled the Bible and Shakespeare. He’s taken on the worlds of both art and science. Vampires and demons and Death, oh my.

With his latest book “Noir” (William Morrow, $27.99), Moore ventures into some new territory. Well, new in a chronological sense anyway. It’s the story of a guy tending bar in San Francisco during the post-WWII years. He’s just trying to get by when he’s swept up into a weird, wild, wide-ranging plot involving secret societies and flying saucers and mysterious government operatives and poisonous snakes and all sorts of strangeness. Oh, and there’s a dame.

There’s always a dame.

Published in Buzz

It takes a special kind of creative self-awareness to allow a story to be exactly as long as it needs to be. The temptation to either heavily inflate or drastically cut a word count in order to fit within certain generally accepted literary parameters is significant, so it’s impressive when a writer is capable of staying utterly true to the tale.

Joe Hill has embraced that notion with his latest book “Strange Weather” (William Morrow, $27.99), a collection of four short novels. Rather than force these narratives to be more than what they are, Hill simply tells the stories as they wish to be told. They’re lean and sharp, with nary an ounce of prosaic fat on any of their bones.

And oh yeah – they’re all excellent.

Published in Buzz
Wednesday, 26 April 2017 12:38

‘Smart Baseball’ lives up to its title

Keith Law book offers depth of sabermetric insight

Published in Sports
Wednesday, 21 December 2016 10:46

The year in books - 2016's recommended reads

This year has been a phenomenal year for the written word. So many brilliant works – fiction and nonfiction alike – appeared on bookshelves in 2016.

Published in Cover Story
Wednesday, 18 May 2016 13:56

Watching the world burn The Fireman'

Joe Hill's latest a sweeping and compelling thriller

Published in Buzz

Advertisements

Website CMS and Development by Links Online Marketing, LLC, Bangor Maine