Admin
Wednesday, 10 April 2013 15:36

To each his own

Some of you may not be thrilled with this recipe, while others may take a gamble and try them as is. While the sauce is optional, at least you've learned how to make fried pickles. Me?!?! I can't stand the things - until I gave it some thought.

I adore pickles in every manner imaginable, except deep fried. So the other night I began thinking of how I could enjoy them other than on a burger or a hot dog. Voila! I made this and now I love fried pickles, prepared my way! The cheesy, mustardy sauce laden with cooked, chopped hot dogs was absolutely perfect as a dip for the pickles. If hot dogs aren't your thing, simply substitute grilled, drained and chopped up, cooked burger mixed in with the sauce. Either way, I am hooked as I think you will be too.

 

Published in The Cooking Edge
Wednesday, 03 April 2013 13:20

A great Greek classic

I adore Greek cuisine, and I have a lifelong ambition to someday visit that great nation. The ancient culture has intrigued me since I was a child, the language has grabbed my attention ever since I learned the Greek alphabet as a teen, and the food makes me want to fly there just to taste authentic spanakopita. But if I can't jump on my jet (yet), at least I can give you a recipe for this dish that is both easy to prepare and delightful to enjoy.

 

Published in The Cooking Edge
Wednesday, 20 March 2013 14:39

There is no argument

Food historians have been arguing about the origin of tarte Tatins almost since its origination. To The Yankee Chef, it is quite clear. At the Hotel Tatin in France, two sisters by the names of Stephanie and Caroline Tatin were both cooks and were in charge of the desserts on a daily basis. One day Stephanie was making an apple dessert and had forgotten about the apples she had been cooking in butter on the stovetop. Thinking she shouldn't waste them, she quickly added a rolled-out pastry dough on top of the apples and stuck the skillet in the oven, hoping to be able to at least create a caramelized apple pastry. When she removed the skillet from the oven and turned it out onto a plate, she was surprised that it wasn't burnt at all and that everything came out perfectly. Ever since that day, this upside-down tarte has been a best seller at the hotel, and with global appeal.

Published in The Cooking Edge
Wednesday, 20 March 2013 12:02

Our Yankee Chef gets published

Readers of our publication need no introduction to the wonderful recipes that James Bailey has shared with us over the years. He's written a column for The Maine Edge as well as many other local print and online publications for many years, creating a name and a following. Bailey also has an online blog and YouTube channel for those who wish to follow his cooking.

Published in Buzz
Wednesday, 27 February 2013 15:08

This is home

Nothing in my repertoire says Yankee, comfort and home quite like bean Swagan. It was the very first dish Dad ever taught me (behind biscuits) to make when I was 14. I have enjoyed it ever since. All us Yankee Chefs have stood by one recipe through the years, only making Swagan with beans, ham, ketchup and water. That's it! So what do I do? Now that my mentors are gone, I am Yanking this thick soup, by adding some great sausage I get from beansmeats.com and a vegetable or two. If you prefer not to add ketchup, use tomato sauce instead. But I find the spices in ketchup fit perfectly with recipe, as did two generations before me. So if anyone rolls their eyes because this isn't a gourmet ingredient so what!

Published in The Cooking Edge
Wednesday, 20 February 2013 15:01

A great weekend breakfast

Eggs Florentine is classically made as below, but with Mornay sauce poured over the top. Although I truly love Mornay (cheese sauce made with Parmesan and another cheese), I wanted to go healthy, just for one morning. I added some grated cheese with the spinach so you won't miss the taste of cheese, yet feel just a little better leaving out the extra calories.

Published in The Cooking Edge
Wednesday, 30 January 2013 16:08

Cantuccini, correctly!

Now everyone and their mother will be telling me that this recipe is biscotti but, being a stubborn, uncooperative Yankee, I beg to argue. If you were to visit central Italy, you would most often find cantuccinis with your cafe della casa, not biscottis. What is the difference, you say? Well, I'll tell ya. Even though all biscottis should truly be called cantuccinis, it is the use of an acid (or yeast) that designates it so. I use lemon juice in this recipe, which helps make them less dry.

Published in The Cooking Edge
Wednesday, 23 January 2013 16:28

Wing day is Sunday

Many of us get together with friends and family every Sunday to watch a game. One of the biggest parts of that great feeling is the food (and of course the beer). Football food should be easy to prepare, easy to serve, carefree and easy to eat. Plop these wings in the oven and wait 'til the first commercial before turning them and the next commercial for removing them. Instead of ordering out, make a pile of these Asian-inspired wings for your get together. Wings really are the ultimate sports food, regardless of their style. Marinated in lime, ginger, soy sauce and a bit of maple syrup, these wings have a wonderful citrus flavor with just a hint of spice from the chili sauce.

Published in The Cooking Edge
Wednesday, 16 January 2013 14:16

Want it Hot or Cold?

What am I doing giving you a cold soup recipe in cold weather? Simply because you don't have to prepare it cold. It is just as delicious when you omit the ricotta and add 2 cups light or heavy cream and gently warm it over low heat, topped with a few flavored croutons.

Gazpacho is traditionally made never touching heat. A variety of vegetables are chopped then processed in a blender until fairly smooth and then served with stale bread. Although I find this satisfactory, it's not the texture I admire completely. I find that cooking a portion of the ingredients makes for a smoother and more flavored meal, if you can call it that. A great lunch though. I live this soup with a hot, grilled vegetable sandwich. Although neither contains meat, it truly is satisfying.

Published in The Cooking Edge
Wednesday, 09 January 2013 14:48

Miso, miso, miso!

I know, I know. Sad pun on Jan Brady's cry, "Marcia, Marcia, Marcia!" - and boy it shows my age, doesn't it? Regardless, I love anything to do with miso, and from your first taste on, I think you will too. Miso is a spice that is fermented rice, barley and/or soy beans. It is something like soy sauce but much deeper in flavor. It has been gaining popularity everywhere since Chef Morimoto has been gracing the networks. To start you out gently, though, here is a great recipe using miso paste. I toned it down a little with hints of ginger and brown sugar. I think you will enjoy this dish with pickled ginger and plain rice.

Published in The Cooking Edge
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