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Tuesday, 10 April 2018 14:25

To the moon and back - ‘Rocket Men’

It’s remarkable to think that 50 years ago, we sent men to the moon with slide rules and punch-card computers. You’ve probably got something in your pocket right now exponentially more powerful than the combined computing power of NASA in the late 1960s.

But send them we did.

While history most clearly remembers Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon back in July of 1969, he and his crew were just the latest in a long line of astronauts who took many first steps of their own – steps that led to the planting of a flag somewhere not of the Earth.

Robert Kurson’s “Rocket Men: The Daring Odyssey of Apollo 8 and the Astronauts Who Made Man’s First Journey to the Moon” (Random House, $28) tells the story of one such step – the mission undertaken by Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders to become the first men ever to travel to the moon. From meticulous research and hours of interviews springs a lively narrative, one that brings the bravery and brainpower of all involved to vivid life.

Published in Tekk

Book offers thoughts on mankind’s outer space destiny

Published in Tekk
Friday, 06 January 2017 12:21

‘Hidden Figures’ a perfect launch

Drama reveals some of the Space Race's unsung heroes

Published in Movies

ORONO A wireless leak detection system created by University of Maine researchers is scheduled to board a SpaceX rocket bound for the International Space Station this summer.

Published in Tekk

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. SpaceX has made good on a high-priority delivery: the world's first inflatable room for astronauts.

Published in Tekk
Wednesday, 06 February 2013 10:30

Across the universe

Take a tour of the vastness of space at the Jordan Planetarium

ORONO The night sky has sparked the imaginations of philosophers, dreamers, scientists and explorers. Learning about the vastness of space is something that many people, young and old, leap at the chance to do. And you can, right in our own back yard.

"Being as small as we are and couched in the bosom of the University it can be difficult to get noticed," said Alan Davenport, the planetarium director and observatory coordinator at the University of Maine's Maynard F. Jordan Planetarium located at Wingate Hall. "The planetarium is quite old. It's been running for 30 years plus now. We've updated a lot of what's inside the planetarium, but it's difficult to go beyond a certain point."

Published in Cover Story

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