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What happens to people when fame is thrust upon them too soon? What if they can’t handle the spotlight, yet neither are they allowed to escape it? And when that shine finally does fade, what if they want to forget? Can they forget?

These are the sorts of questions that writer/illustrator Michael Kupperman asks in his new graphic memoir “All the Answers” (Gallery 13, $25). It’s the story of his father Joel Kupperman, who in the years during and immediately after World War II was one of the most famous figures in the country, thanks to his childhood participation on a wildly popular radio program. It was a past the elder Kupperman fought to forget, but when the specter of dementia loomed, Michael sought to learn more about this time in his father’s life before it was lost to the rapidly-blooming cloud of oblivion.

Published in Style

There are few bonds as close as those that exist between brothers. And some fraternal bonds transcend even the typical, creating a tight-knit relationship built on an intimacy that no outsider could possibly fully understand.

It’s that latter dynamic that impacts every page of “Like Brothers” (Ballantine, $28) by Mark and Jay Duplass. The Duplass Brothers – patron saints of bootstrap DIY indie filmmaking – have been one of the most fertile and interesting creative partnerships of the 21st century. Their considerable talents in numerous aspects of filmmaking – acting, writing, directing, producing, you name it – helped, of course, but it’s the passion, ambition and determination inherent to their partnership that truly led to their success.

Published in Style
Wednesday, 04 April 2018 12:37

‘How to American’ humorous and heartfelt

The United States is a nation of immigrants. And every single one of those immigrants has a different and unique American experience.

Comedian Jimmy O. Yang is probably best known for his role as Jian Yang on HBO’s “Silicon Valley.” He’s also an immigrant; he came to this country as a teenager, moving from Hong Kong to Los Angeles with his family at the age of 13. As you can imagine, it was culture shock of a high order.

Yang’s new book “How to American: An Immigrant’s Guide to Disappointing Your Parents” (Da Capo, $27) relates his experience and how he assimilated – sometimes successfully, sometimes not so much – into this strange new home.

Published in Buzz
Wednesday, 14 June 2017 12:12

‘Believe Me’ worth believing in

Izzard memoir packed with honesty, heartfelt humor

Published in Style

Penobscot Theatre Company presents fun, heartfelt one-woman show

Published in Happenings
Wednesday, 21 September 2016 11:52

An unauthorized autobiography

Norm Macdonald's 'Based on a True Story' weird, wildly entertaining

Be honest whenever you see the words 'based on a true story,' you immediately start wondering just how much of what you're about to read/watch/listen to can be considered truth. Truth is a funny thing, particularly in the realm of biography or memoir; our memories tend to recall actual events with a surprising amount of flexibility.

Published in Buzz
Wednesday, 14 September 2016 11:25

In Such Good Company' a sweet showbiz memoir

New book peeks behind the scenes of 'The Carol Burnett Show'

The list of names that would warrant discussion for inclusion in the pantheon of television comedy is a relatively short one. And the list of women on that list would be unfortunately (and undeservedly) far shorter.

Published in Style
Wednesday, 13 July 2016 11:38

True north Welcome to the Goddamn Ice Cube'

Memoir offers a story of self-discovery in the lands of ice and snow

The quest to discover where we truly belong can be an arduous one. So many people spend countless months and years striving to figure out just who they want to be. It's a journey that can prove to be daunting, surprising, rewarding and terrifying sometimes all at the same time.

Published in Adventure
Wednesday, 24 July 2013 15:55

Heads in Beds'

Quality service . . . at a price

At one time or another, the service industry has claimed everyone, and may again. It is a giant industry that operates in the open and in the dark like black ops. If assistance is needed, somebody is waiting to help, either with reluctance or insane enthusiasm. And the bane of any service worker's existence is that one guy demanding the impossible, and then turning their frustration onto them. Jacob Tomsky has seen it all, and in 'Heads in Beds: A Reckless Memoir of Hotels, Hustles, and So-Called Hospitality' (Vintage, $15) he tells all.

Published in Buzz
Wednesday, 08 August 2012 15:49

A different kind of ghost story

Giving Up the Ghost' a haunting, haunted memoir

Being a teenager can be difficult. Being a teenager who's a little (or a lot) different can be even more difficult. Being a teenager who's a little different in a small town can border on the impossible or at least it can feel that way.

That's the way Eric Nuzum felt growing up in Canton, Ohio in the early 1980s. That's according to Nuzum's memoir 'Giving Up the Ghost' (Dial Press, $15), a thoughtful, poignant and painfully funny look back at the ghosts of childhood.

But there is more than one kind of ghost.

Published in Buzz
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