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Babe Ruth equals big bucks.

A baseball jersey worn by The Bambino sold for more than $4.4 million Sunday, a record for any item of sports memorabilia, according to the buyer and seller.

SCP Auctions, based in California, said the circa 1920 New York Yankees uniform top is the earliest known jersey worn by Ruth and it fetched $4,415,658 at the company's April auction, which ended Sunday. That price broke the previous record of $4,338,500 set in 2010 for James Naismith's founding rules of basketball.

Lelands.com said it submitted the winning bid for the jersey, which had been displayed for years at The Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum in Baltimore. The road top has 'New York' written across the front and the Hall of Fame slugger wore it shortly after he was sold to the Yankees by the Boston Red Sox for $100,000 following the 1919 season.

Published in Sports
Wednesday, 16 May 2012 12:27

Four four-baggers

Hamilton becomes 16th with four homers in one game

Since Babe Ruth exploded onto the scene almost a century ago, major league baseball and its fans have been enamored of the home run. 'Chicks dig the long ball,' as the old advertising catchphrase has it. Even the sports performance-enhancing drug issues were born largely from that desire to hit the ball ever farther.

However, even with that hundred-year obsession with power, one of the rarest individual feats in baseball is the four-homer game. Only 15 men had ever reached that pinnacle that is, until this season.

Welcome to the club, Josh Hamilton.

Published in Sports
Thursday, 26 April 2012 07:04

White Sox's Humber throws perfect game

SEATTLE - Phil Humber had Tommy John surgery before his career even started. He bounced around a bit as he tried to make it in the major leagues.

Now, well, Humber is perfect.

Humber threw the first perfect game in the majors in almost two years, leading the Chicago White Sox to a 4-0 victory over the Seattle Mariners on Saturday.

'What just took place was just awesome,' he said.

It was baseball's 21st perfect game and first since Philadelphia's Roy Halladay threw one against the Florida Marlins on May 29, 2010. It was the third in White Sox's history, joining Mark Buehrle against Tampa Bay on July 23, 2009, and Charles Robertson against Detroit on April 30, 1922.

Published in Sports
Wednesday, 04 April 2012 13:17

Baseball is back

Forget about those two Seattle and Oakland games that were played in Japan at 6 a.m. our time and replayed on tape delay three hours later this week. (Side note: Is there anything in the entire world of televised sport that's lamer than tape delay? I would say no.) Baseball season is back, and with it comes a lot of change. Change for the better.

First off it means the winter is over, spring is here and soon after comes summer. I'll talk about the Red Sox a little bit, but the fact that the games are back changes the way you live your life. I don't mean that as an extremely deep thought, because it isn't. For roughly 160 (accounting for the occasional rain out or double header) of the next 200 days, you have entertainment. Whether you watch the game from inning one to inning nine, check in on it for a few pitches to see the score, listen to it on the radio, or just have it on in the background while you do other things, the Sox are back. There is also the annual Fenway trip many like to make. Ask people and they'll say, 'I try to get down once a year.' Then of course you get there and the seats are uncomfortable and you spent 500 bucks on the day, but hey, it's Fenway. Had to make the annual visit.

Published in The Sports Edge
Wednesday, 29 February 2012 12:24

Red Sox owners ready to move on in 2012

FORT MYERS, Fla. - John Henry was walking off the stage after a television interview during his team's first full-squad workout of the spring when the Boston owner was confronted by a lifelong Red Sox fan holding a bright red sign with white letters.

'All we ask is that you make us proud again to be a Boston Red Sox fan,' the sign read.

'We're trying,' Henry told her.

Published in Sports
Tuesday, 18 October 2011 14:37

An open letter to Theo Epstein

Dear Mr. Epstein,

I've been a Red Sox fan for a pretty long time. I first started really following the Red Sox at the tail end of the 1986 season. I had just started the fifth grade and the Sox were making their memorable run to the World Series. So my fandom was born in heartbreak. From day one, I understood that being a Red Sox fan meant being disappointed. It meant understanding that it wasn't a matter of if the Sox would blow it, but rather when.

And then you came along, Mr. Epstein. You came along and changed what it meant to be a Sox fan. You and yours took a team that hadn't won a championship in eight decades and landed two rings in a span of four years. You were only in the driver's seat for nine seasons, but in that time, you completely changed the perception of the Boston Red Sox organization.

Published in Sports
Thursday, 13 October 2011 09:53

October odyssey

Thoughts on the 2011 MLB playoffs

Published in Cover Story
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