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Using a carrier is the safest way to transport an animal from your home to another location. I would particularly discourage anyone from transporting a cat that is not secured in a carrier. No matter how well behaved your cat is, if you are in an accident your cat will be terrified and will do everything they can to get away.

Unfortunately, most cats only see their carrier moments before they are forced into them to be taken on a car ride, usually to the veterinarian, groomer or boarding kennel. Often the end result is a cat that runs and hides the minute they are aware of the presence of the carrier. Finding and extracting a cat from a hiding place without getting scratched or bitten can be a prolonged and stressful process, one that is terrifying for your cat and frustrating for you. Wouldn’t your cat be happier and your life significantly easier if your cat enjoyed their carrier and perhaps even walked right in? Getting there is not as complicated as you might think.

Tuesday, 24 March 2015 18:51

Helping them help

by Katy England

Kids are helpful, but they don’t typically help with anything. They want to – they’re just bad at it. Really bad at it. But they were also bad at walking at one point, and that got better (or worse, depending on how many head injuries you have to field annually). 

Helping the kids help can be daunting. Because as adults, we are so much better at things than they are. So it’s faster and in some cases safer to do it yourself. But it isn’t helpful. It isn’t helpful to you, it isn’t helpful to them and it isn’t helpful to society as a whole.

Monday, 23 March 2015 09:47

Scholarships available for Maine students

by PR

ELLSWORTH and PORTLAND—The Maine Community Foundation offers nearly 520 scholarships that support students pursuing music, journalism, teaching, horticulture, technology, the arts and many other fields. They are available for students who attend secondary, post-secondary and graduate schools, as well as non-traditional programs. 

A complete listing of scholarships available for the upcoming school year is now online at the Maine Community Foundation website, www.mainecf.org.

Celebratory dinner will be held at the Food Bank in Auburn on April 9

AUBURN – Bill Williamson, Maine market president for Bank of America, will be honored with the JoAnn Pike Humanitarian Award at a dinner at Good Shepherd Food Bank on April 9.

BANGOR -- The New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE) presented Patricia Collins of Caribou with the David C. Knapp Award for Trusteeship at its 13th annual New England Higher Education Excellence Award ceremony held in Boston on Friday, March 13, 2015. The former chairwoman of the University of Maine System Board of Trustees, Collins was recognized for her substantive contributions to improving higher education opportunities in Maine and New England. 

Collins served on the UMS board from 1987 to 1997 and in 1991 was selected as the second woman ever to serve as board chair. The University System embarked on some of its most ambitious and far-reaching initiatives under her leadership, including the launch of Maine’s first technology-based distance education programs. Many policies and programs begun during her tenure continue to the present day. Her son, Sam Collins, is the current chair of the UMS Board of Trustees.

Wednesday, 18 March 2015 15:01

Colorectal cancer screening saves lives

by PR

BANGOR – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one-third of adults age 50 and older have not been screened for colorectal cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. During the month of March, Eastern Maine Medical Center is recognizing Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month by raising awareness about screening and the fact that in many cases, this common type of cancer is preventable.

“About six out of every ten deaths from the disease can be avoided,” says Scott Stern, DO, a gastroenterologist at EMMC Gastroenterology Center of Maine. “That’s why screening is so essential, and why it’s important for anyone who is over the age of 50 to talk with their primary care provider about it.”

Wednesday, 18 March 2015 14:43

That doesn’t go there

by Katy England

While looking for a piece of train under the fridge I found most of the alphabet and several math problems. This was along with more pieces of cereal than I’m comfortable disclosing in a public forum. Sure, the letters and numbers were from a magnet set, but it illustrates a strange thing that happens when you’re a parent – you find weird things in weird places.

Once, I went into the girls’ room to find they were chewing on something like gum. Except it wasn’t gum. It was fluff from one of their stuffed animals they had poked a hole in. I have two full packages of crayons in my purse – along with an emergency bag of goldfish crackers. Most of the coats in the house contain some kid-friendly snack for doctor’s visits or just for me to scarf when no one is looking.

Hannaford Supermarkets today donated $19,000 in food to Good Shepherd Food Bank, as part of a hunger-relief campaign that produced more than $1 million in product and cash donations across five Northeast states, including $240,000 in Maine. 

Hannaford Helps Fight Hunger took place in December and included a “you-buy-one, we-give-one” component; Hannaford pledged to donate identical products when customers purchased specific shelf-stable items. The food donated Wednesday included 373 cases of pasta, 412 cases of pasta sauce, 448 cases of canned vegetables and 297 cases of cereal.

ORONO — More than 480 middle school girls from around the state are expected to take part in the annual University of Maine conference that aims to provide a safe and encouraging environment to explore science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

The 28th Expanding Your Horizons conference takes place March 12 on the UMaine campus and features workshops for students, as well as teachers of the 25 participating schools.

Monday, 16 March 2015 15:26

Colorectal cancer screening saves lives

by PR

BANGOR – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one-third of adults age 50 and older have not been screened for colorectal cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. During the month of March, Eastern Maine Medical Center is recognizing Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month by raising awareness about screening and the fact that in many cases, this common type of cancer is preventable.

“About six out of every ten deaths from the disease can be avoided,” says Scott Stern, DO, a gastroenterologist at EMMC Gastroenterology Center of Maine. “That’s why screening is so essential, and why it’s important for anyone who is over the age of 50 to talk with their primary care provider about it.”

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